Sailing towards the Jumentos Cays and Ragged Island chain we didn’t expect much. From the sailors we had talked to, this area is all about enjoying the remoteness because the islands are mostly wild and uninhabited.

The region is just over 110 miles in length and isn’t much more than a series of rocks sticking up in the middle of the ocean. We thought of this portion of our journey as a mini pilgrimage.  It’s as far south as we’ll make it in the Bahamas (this trip) , so why not head to the more wild islands for our last hurrah.  Plus, with minimal protection for anchoring combined with limited cell reception it felt like a solid challenge…and we wanted to get a few more nautical miles under our belt before sailing north.

This pilgrimage is all about exploring the deep south, with no expectations or specific mission in mind.  It’s sometimes hard to get ourselves in this mindset but its how we try to approach most of our travels. Being open minded with no preconceived ideas of what lies ahead sets us up for spontaneous experiences, and leaves the the door wide open for serendipity.

I have so many emotional attachments to this leg of the journey, yet I still haven’t worked out in my mind why.  It felt like the perfect end to our Bahamas journey.

From navigating the shallow waters and dodging coral heads, to the remote spear fishing on our own.  These last couple of weeks were more confidence building moments mingled with unforgettable encounters with the locals.  Being embraced by and throwing back drinks with the fishermen and women on Ragged Cay was unreal.  It blew us away how from before we even walked in the door, we were treated like long time friends.  No sideways glances, no judgement, just instant welcome shots and big Bahamian hugs.

While the Bahamas do have a similar look throughout: rocky islands with green shrubs and clear blue waters, there is a distinct vibe that changes with each cluster and community. The whole of the Jumentos and Ragged Cays felt secluded, quiet and wild.  Like a place of refuge.

It’s said that a picture is worth a thousand words, that a complex idea can be conveyed with just a single still image and its meaning is more effective and has a deeper impact than a description.  Hopefully these images leave you with the same warm and fuzzy euphoric feeling we get looking back on them.

sailing the deep south

sailing bahamas ragged islands

sailing about the world

sunsets at sea

flamingo island pink salt pond

sailing the jumento islands bahamas

dead isup

anchorage all to ourselves

sailing the jumento islands bahamas

diving and sailing the jumento islands bahamas

diving and sailing the jumento islands bahamas

sailing the deep south

remote islands and private beaches

trash dump in the bahamas

duncan town the deep south

dilapidated bahamas

sailing bahamas ragged islands

salty explorations

Thanks so much for joining us and being a part of the journey.

If you have any questions or just want to say hello, leave us a note in the comment box below.  If you enjoyed this post share it with a friend. It helps us keep the posts and videos flowing.

Sailing Report

To see our full map with interactive pins, click here: gonewiththewynns.com/map

Dates: April 2 – 10, 2017
Nautical Miles Sailed: 118 from Long Island to Ragged Cay
Anchorages:  We used our Garmin Blue Charts with the Active Captain overlay to pick our anchorages.  They are clearly marked with reviews and additional information.
Cell & WiFi: Our cell phone signal/data only worked in Ragged Cay and just outside of Ragged Cay with our booster on.

Gear Used In This Video

Cameras Used to Capture This Video