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The Best Small RV’s – Living Large in a Small Space

What’s so great about small RV’s?  They are more fuel efficient, easy to drive and they can pack all the amenities of a home in a tiny floor plan…but best of all it rolls down the road on 4 wheels.

We get a lot of emails, tweets and facebook messages with questions from newbies wanting to hit the road in an RV.  Normally we try and respond to each one individually and help as many people as we can.  Then after too many of the same scenarios, it finally hit us; we should be sharing these answers with all of you!  We figure if we miss something, one of you will chime in and offer your take, and if you had similar questions, maybe this will help!  So, let’s dive in on selecting the best small RV!

Before you read too far check out this short video that we created when looking to downsize from Windy (our 32 foot Monaco Vesta) into something much smaller.

Mary from Texas asks: I own a small business that takes me across the USA.  For years I’ve been traveling by plane, renting cars and hotels, but I’m tired of all that hassle.  I’m considering purchasing a small RV and driving to visit my clients.  Along the way I plan to take mini vacations from white water kayaking during the spring, to bicycle races in the summer, and of course snowboarding in the winter.  I will be traveling alone most of the time however there is a chance one of my kids might meet up with me along the way for an adventure or two.  My style is contemporary, and I despise the look of most RV’s (both inside and out).  I’ve never owned an RV and I definitely don’t want a large one or a tow-behind trailer.  If you can recommend a few small RV’s for me to look at I’d be so thankful to have the help.

 

 

Well Mary, we’re happy to help you start your RV life on the road!  I will honestly tell you driving vs. flying is 10x more relaxing.  Sure it might take longer, but you’ll save money and your sanity in the long run.  Here is our 2 cents:

  • Class B or small class C Motorhome seems best.
  • With a class B you can travel anywhere, park anywhere, and sleep anywhere without drawing attention to the fact you’re in an RV.  If James Bond RV’ed this would be his choice.
  • Don’t hold your breath on contemporary styling, there’s not much out there.
  • Diesel is the best option since you’ll be driving through mountains.
  • Dodge/Mercedes Sprinter chassis is a great option for small RV’s.  This allows you to have an engine/chassis that serviceable across the entire USA, which any mechanic can work on.
  • You must buy the RV for you, not your kids.  Sure they might come out to visit but they can tent, or sleep on the floor.  The worst thing you can do is purchase a larger RV than you want with an extra bed you don’t need 99% of the time.
  • There won’t be a ton of space to store your toys, but you can purchase a bike rack for the back, strap a kayak on the roof, etc.
  • For this size RV you won’t need a tow car.
  • All of our recommendations offer everything you need to live both plugged in, or off the cord and in nature.

Below are our favorite Super Small RV’s and a few reasons why we think they’ll work for you.  We suggest you visit a dealership and test drive the first 2.  After the test drive tell the salesperson to leave.  Sit in that RV for at least an hour by yourself (do NOT bring a friend, they will get bored).  Bring your laptop and sit and type.  Pretend you’re cooking, eating, showering, and using the toilet (remember to just pretend).  Open every cabinet and envision where your clothes will hang.  Try and find the best and worst of each RV and write it down.  If it’s warm or cold outside have the salesman crank up the generator, or plug you in so you can regulate the temperature.  This is a large purchase, and if you plan to travel thousands of miles, and live in this RV you need to spend some quality time with the RV at the dealership.  DO NOT BUY on the first day: You may need to visit your RV at least 2 more times before making a purchase.
Now that we have all that out of the way, here are our top recommendations.



 

The Incognito:  Airstream Interstate Twin Dual Wardrobe

 airstream_interstate_exterior1

The upsides:

  • Contemporary – the most contemporary class B inside and out.
  • Twin Beds – This model has 2 twin beds in the back which allows a separate bed for company (of course this means you’ll be sleeping on a twin bed so you have to be ok with that).  There is another model with a fold flat sofa in the back if twins aren’t your cup of tea.
  • Understated Exterior – No big stickers or swirls, this RV looks like any other van on the road.
  • Wardrobe – What we like best about this model is the 4 wardrobe spaces to hold your clothes/shoes/etc.  Many class B motorhomes only have 1 wardrobe space, and with the amount of travel you’re talking about we think the more storage the better.

airstream_interstate_floorplan

The downsides:

  • Wet-Bath – This means your toilet is inside the shower.  Some people love this style of shower, and others hate it.  Make sure you understand how it works before your purchase
  • Size – Class B’s are small.  You need to ask yourself: can I live in such a tiny space?
  • Storage – Minimal exterior and interior storage, difficult for long trips.

airstream_interstate_interior1

Base MSRP: not listed, but I’m sure it’ll be greater than $120,000
Dealership: Vogt and Explore USA are the 2 main Airstream dealerships in DFW.

 

Breathing Room:  Winnebago View 24M

 

View_profile_exterior

The upsides:

  • Slide – There is a giant slide on the driver’s side that gives you ample living space when parked.
  • No Bed – Our favorite RV floor plan!  There is no bed in the back so you get a huge bathroom and shower area.  The main bed is located in the loft area above the driver’s seats.
  • Pull out sofa – there is a pull out sofa so you can sleep 1-2 visitors.
  • Kitchen – larger sink, stove and refrigerator than a class B RV.
  • Storage – 5 times more storage (inside and out)
    than a class B.
  • Bigger Tanks – Freshwater/Black/Grey tanks are much larger for living off the cord.

View_profile_floorplan
The downsides:

  • Size – This is a compact class C but it’s taller and wider than a standard van.
  • Exterior – Looks like an RV.
  • Interior – not exactly contemporary, but it’s a clean style.
  • Fuel Economy – I would expect this RV to get 2 MPG less than a class B RV.

View_profile_interior

Base MSRP: $102,687
Dealership: McClain’s is the main dealership for Winnebago in DFW.

 

The Transformer:  Leisure Travel Vans U24MB

leisurevan_unity

The upsides:

  • Cool TV – 26” Hidden LCD Screen drops into cabinet!
  • Murphy Bed – How cool is that, the bed pops out of the wall when you need it!
  • Storage – Large Closet Space with plenty of storage inside and out.
  • Huge Bathroom – Might be the largest bathroom of any Class B.
  • Contemporary Styling – Curved cabinets and streamlined designs inside.
  • Slideout – Slide offers additional living space when parked.

leisure_unity-u24mb_floorplan
The downsides:

  • Size – This is a B+ so the length and height is slightly larger than a class B, but smaller than a class C.
  • Exterior – Looks like an RV, but the paint is pretty simple.
  • Bed – Murphy bed doesn’t allow for additional sleeping

leisurevan_unity_interior

unity_queen_size-murphy_bed

Base MSRP: $113,000
Dealership: Vogt is the Leisure Travel Van dealership in Ft. Worth, TX

 

The Custom:  Sportsmobile Sprinter Extended

 

sportsmobile_exterior

The upsides:

  • Custom – Every piece of the interior is customizable.  You want 2 beds, you want a big kitchen, you need wardrobe space
  • Contemporary – they have cabinets for the traditional or the contemporary
  • Sofa Beds – In the back the sofa converts to 1 queen bed, or 2 twin beds!
  • 4 Wheel Drive – If you plan to be off-roading (or in snow a lot) 4wd might be an option.
  • Pop-Up Roof – Pop up roofs offer additional room and sleeping/storage while parked

sportsmobile_sample_floorplan
The downsides:

  • Time – if you’re in a rush I’m not sure how long a build-out takes
  • Same as Airstream – Wet Bath, small size, minimal storage
  • Loans – A custom van conversion like this is not RVIA, which means you cannot get an extended loan like a standard RV

sportsmobile_interiior

*Other Brands – There are plenty of other brands doing custom small RVs including GTRV, Outside Vans, Advanced RV just to name a few, so do some online research before diving into one specific brand.
Example MSRP: $76,900 (its custom so you’ll have to build your own for a price)
Dealership:  Sportsmobile of TX in Austin

 

VIP Things to Keep in Mind: (plus check out our Shady Truth About Buying An RV)

  • Price – most non-custom RV’s sell for a negotiated 20-30% less than MSRP.
  • Used – Buy used and the savings are huge.  Expect to pay 50% off MSRP for an RV that’s 3+ years old.
  • Loans – Loans for RV’s are structured similar to homes.  Length of loans can be extended far longer than a typical vehicle loan, so your monthly payment is more affordable.
  • Taxes – You get to take a huge tax deduction, you can write off the interest, and if you’re using this RV for a small business you can write the majority of it off!  Talk to your CPA about the rules.

 

If you have a favorite small RV share the make & model with us in the comments below!  We love hearing how different people live small on the road!

Disclosure: The RV Mfrs. did not ask or pay us to create this article.  These recommendations are based on RV’s that we’ve seen either in-person or online.  We cannot guarantee the quality of these brands and we recommend you take this information as a friendly recommendations and nothing more.  Happy Hunting!

Famous for my "how-not-to" videos, and typically the man behind the camera, sometimes I’m forced to be here in the “spotlight”. When you see my face you’re probably reading something more technical than adventurous, but either way I do my best to tell it like it is and infuse my opinions into the commentary…after all this is a blog and not MSN.

Comments (224)

  • Sandy Elers

    We bought a 24 foot Itasca Navion iq 5 years ago and love traveling in it. Lots of bells and whistles, comfortable queen walk-around bed, 2 bump outs. I am now 77 and do all the packing and set up as my husband has disabilities. We usually take a tow car (Ford Fiesta). It definitely looks like an RV, gets about 15 miles to the gallon, even towing. The only problem with the diesel is that the check engine light comes on after it has been in storage and often does not go off until we have made a couple of starts and stops. Mercedes could not find anything wrong. There are a couple of configurations and pretty good storage inside and out. I put the cat litter box in the shower on an over-sized piece of plastic (drop cloth or extra large bag) and we use the RV camp showers. When kitty stays home, I use the shower as intended. This would be a very comfy place for a single. Grand kids sleep on air mats on the floor. Bed has a curtain making it into a private bedroom. Easy to drive once you get used to the mirrors. Uses two end to end parking places at the super market.

    reply
  • Vi Lam

    Three years ago, I sold my house. Kept my 2000 Subaru Outback wagon, had U-Haul install a hitch, and then I drove to Backus, Minnesota to the Scamp travel trailer factory & picked up my new 13′ Scamp travel trailer w/front bathroom & shower.Wayne Pitlick is the best Scamp salesman there. Scamp does not have dealers, sells factory direct. Have travelled 12,000 miles enjoying beautiful USA, Canada & Mexico ever since, and currently on-the-road, averaging 21-23 mpg!!! Works for me, a solo 60 yr old female w/small mutt mix. So many wonderful people to meet & places to go! And family to visit, spread all over the place! Life is short! Thinking about RVing isn’t actually doing it! Go now!!! Go light! Go small! A great resource is http://www.escapees.com, geared towards the full-time traveller! Talk to actual Rv’ers, not RV dealers. Quartzsite, Arizona in January each year is sort of “RVWoodstock,” and you’ll see a huge variety of every age, shape, size of RV’s & Rv’ers. Some good RV deals in Yuma, AZ in March when the Snowbirds head north & sell their RV’s. Best wishes & hope to see you on-the-road! Vi & Lucky, in “Portable Petite Palace”

    reply
    • Robbyn Krupa

      Hello,
      I am considering doing the same thing. Do you have a Facebook Account?

      reply
  • Dana Edwards

    Hello,
    We’re looking for a used Class C (one slideout – sleeps at least 4), 31 foot and under. Do you have opinions about the best in this class and size? Thanks so much!! It’s overwhelming!

    reply
    • Curious Minion

      Hi Dana. I don’t believe the Wynns ever reviewed any Class C’s. It may sound odd, but I’d suggest that you go online to RVTrader.com. RVTrader has listings for used and new RV’s. You can narrow your selections on the right-hand side by Class, length, etc. Take a look at some of the floor plans of units that come up and see if one or two manufacturers stick out as a favorites. Then you can research those brands and go from there.

      reply
  • Steve Goldfield

    I’m looking for the smallest vehicle I can find as most of my trips will be just me with possibly one other passenger occasionally. I’m looking, for example, at the RoadTrek Simplicity SRT. A friend has an older one that he bought used. I’m wondering if the SRT is too big for me, though, it has most of the amenities I want (I don’t see options for a CD player or solar panels on the roof, though). I like the idea that it has a shower. You don’t mention RoadTreks at all. Any comments? I like some of the conversions, but they have a longer wait time than I’d like.

    reply
    • Curious Minion

      Hey Steve. The Wynns are without internet at the moment so I’ll jump in. RoadTreks have a lot of great amenities in a small package. RoadTrek has a webpage with lots of info and posts by guest bloggers who have RoadTreks. You should find bloggers with insight and helpful info there. http://roadtreking.com/ The Fit RV has looked at & reviewed a LOT of van-based RV’s (they travel in a Winnebago Travato now). Check out their videos here: https://www.thefitrv.com/rv-reviews/ We’re the Russos are in a Hymer Aktiv but have a FAQ section on van life that might be of interest as well: https://weretherussos.com/camper-van-life-faq/ That should give you some food for thought.

      reply
  • Linda Bruce

    Aloha. Moving from Big Island to begin full time RVing on the mainland. Love the info on this site. Single, retired, senior female with a passion for driving and traveling. Collecting intel on small class B or vans. Thanks. Linda Bruce

    reply
    • Mariel

      Hi Linda. I too am considering purchasing an RV to travel where I want and stay as long as I want. I am also a single, retired female. I am enjoying checking out the class B models. Happy & safe travels to you.
      Mariel

      reply
  • Maurice Lee

    You didn’t mention that the Winnebago View 24M is on a Mercedes Sprinter chassis which currently has the blutec diesel engine. There are enough issues with that engine that it is worth mentioning in your review that it has that engine.

    reply
  • We really like the murphy bed layout and larger bathroom. Does Mercedes offer this design with an extra sleeping area over the cab for guests?
    Also, I wish all motorhome manufactures would take into consideration that many of us have pets, so why not design spaces comfortable for our fur babies? I’d like a secure pedestal in the middle of the front seats for our little dog and a designated kitty litter area. I’d also like a screened-in ‘porch’ area under the awning that is completely secure and dog proof. I’m thinking about snapping in screens from the lower body of the RV and then using tent stakes to secure the bottom of the screen into the ground so pets can’t escape under the RV. Screens could be lowered from the other three sides extending the length and width of the awning and secured with tent states. Thus when you open the side door, pets can go into the screen-in porch and be safe from predators.
    Finally, I work from home on my computer. Do these RVs have good WiFi and Internet connection? Would it be possible to connect to Skype while my husband is driving down the road?
    Thanks for your videos. I really enjoy them.

    reply
    • Curious Minion

      I’ll bet a quick web check for that model will pull up all the floor plans that are available. A pet model would be nice for those of us with fur babies! There are some after-market screen enclosures that zip onto an awning, so you might like to check those out. I’ve also seen people carry folding fencing to make a small enclosure for smaller dogs.

      As for internet connections, RVs generally do not come with WiFi. Most nomads carry hotspots to connect to the internet, and if you are dependent on the internet for work you should consider plans and hotspots from both AT&T and Verizon. Whether you could Skype while underway is a different story altogether: if using a hotspot it would be just like your cellphone connection, so you may want to try it on your phone and see how well it works. I suspect that if you are in the eastern or midwest states you might pull it off, but out west cellphone connections can be spotty and slow.

      reply
    • Elaine MDG60

      I second the need for a kitty friendly model. Every van and smaller Class C I look at-it’s my #1 “look-see”, as strange as it may sound. I’m an almost 60 single who wants to transition to FT wanderer with my fur-baby. Actually, my 3 kids live in 3 opposing points of the country-NorthEast, South Fl and Co, and i’d Be traveling in between most of the time. My friends have also scattered with several also living in RVs. While they have dogs, a kitty and everything that comes with her-is completely different.
      My daughter found a fold-up, 4ft high, 3ft wide “enclosure” that the kids think could be easily secured to the back of an RV or Van with something like a bike rack. I’d still have to put together some kind of shelves, etc every time I set it up-but it seems like it would be more secure than a screened in-cats claws & all. My biggest thing is getting her exercise and while my girl is harness-trained, she gets lazy after a block or two and insists on being carried. Not sure how much longer i’ll be able to carry her 18lbs + long hair & undercoat with my back though…
      If I have to, i’ll get her a small stroller, something i’m considering right now anyways.
      My eldest is coming up here in a few weeks to go looking at dealerships with me, (i’m currently in the Poconos). She’s also going to start helping me chisel away at my stuff and take most of my “collections” back to her place as well as several tubs of stuff i’ve Been storing for her siblings. Paring everything down, despite the fact I lost 80% of my stuff in a fire a few years ago, is going to be the hardest thing. Most of my collectibles, things from India and Asia and about 1/2 my books were in a room that got minimal damage. Still though, besides some classes I’m currently taking; I can NOT figure out HOW i’ve Accumulated SO much STUFF in 2 years! ??

      reply
  • Bruce mulkin

    Enjoy your takes on class b rv . Have you ever looked into the couch house rv out of Florida would love your opinion. Thanks bruce

    reply
  • Matt Goodwin

    My wife and I bought a 1994 Winnebago Warrior last Summer which is built on a Toyota Frame. Very roomy, a lot of fun, but a bit underpowered with a V6 engine. We have loved easing into the RV lifestyle during our Summer vacations.

    reply
  • Wilfried Gerolstein

    Love your Videos and great Suggestions.
    I always loved your 1st. Motor-home Monarch Vesta. Was there a particular Reason you sold it? Any Problems with it? What was the real average Mpg.? I am thinking of looking for a used one. So any advice is greatly appreciated.

    reply
  • Didi Chalero

    Thanks….I loved all your information. My husband and I are looking for a small, but comfortable RV with a queen bed. My husband is handicapped so be also need room to put his scooter, walker, small wheelchair. We are probably looking for a B+. We plan on touring the USA for 2 years and then selling the RV. We do not need luxury, but comfort is important. We cannot have a murphy bed because there are days when my husband will have to lie in bed for hours. We need ease because we are in our late 60s. What ever information you have will be helpful.
    Thank you
    Didi
    Longmeadow, MA

    reply
    • Curious Minion

      Check for manufacturers who offer ability-equipped motorhomes & trailers. Looks like Winnebago has quite a few. You might also search for RV forums for handi-capable travelers. https://winnebagoind.com/products/specialty-vehicles/2016/ability-equipped/overview

      reply
    • walter

      i was reading thru these various replies.. and on my own looking for a vehicle I solo could travel in the USA and Canada….i am now 73…. what surprised me was a fellow townsperson if such a word exists.. I have lived in Longmeadow MA since 1958 .. in the first graduation class of Longmeadow in 1961 .. as the first freshman class to graduate started in 1957… Didi… I live on Whitmun Road.. it would be nice to contact with you if you so desired to do so too. Walt

      reply
      • Phyllis A Prokes

        Where can I find a class c rv. For $2500

        reply
  • joanne

    I have a chysler sebring the manual says it will only tow 1000 lbs. Do you know if there are any small lightweight trailers I could check out. Does anything packed in the car count towards the weight ? Or a small class b that would tow the sebring ? Or am I just out of luck and need to regroup all

    reply
    • Curious Minion

      You might look at something very lightweight like a @Tab trailer, but 1000 lbs isn’t very much. You might have better luck getting a small RV to tow the car, but check your owner’s manual first to see if you can tow the car 4-down or if you would need a tow dolly. Also, small RVs won’t have a huge towing capacity either, so make sure you check to check that against the weight of your car.

      reply
  • Riley L Mason

    Need help starting out I’m 63 with limited income

    reply
    • CARYN MAHER

      I enjoy watching the videos from different people on youtube.com . you can search for whatever topic you want and subscribe to anyone’s channel for free when you think you want to hear more about their adventures. I was watching a few vids of people dealing with their blackwater tanks or different options like composting and the other. I don’t like any of those options that I have seen yet. You can also get good ideas where to stop on your trip. god luck! have fun! I hope to be out there somewhere hiking in a park and driving a class B this fall.

      reply
  • Riley L Mason

    Hi im 63 and Gong to start the rv life with a 1986 class C trying to start out with a limited income but have grandkids 11 hours away on both sides of me need pionters

    reply
    • Ana Rubio

      You can do this! I pray safe travels for you, with plenty of beautiful scenery along your journey! Be blessed and enjoy traveling.

      reply
  • Kay

    Hi Charlotte. I’m in the same situation as u. I hav recently been put on diability, but I want to downsize w travel trailer. I hav family & friends all over this country. I eant to be flexible to go wherever. Good luck in ur search!!

    reply
  • wilkie schell

    Check out Roadtreks. They are around 19′ to 22′ in length, reasonably priced compared to what you get, many engineering patents, good storage, good mileage, can park in garage at home and most parking spaces (even in downtown areas). We loved our two.

    reply
  • William Inglis

    I pull a 2005 31 ft Holiday Rambler with a 2005 Hemi Dodge Durango. REQUIRES a Hensley Arrow hitch. My longest trip was a SW USA tour of seven weeks, 4 K miles; 11mpg. Only problem was heating on long pulls (east slope approach to Grand Canyon for example). I learned to stop overnight at the bottom of that kind of hill and gear down at the first sign of heating. I would rather have a F250 but I like driving the Durango when not towing. I have 20K in the trailer, bought new. Normal maintenance. Lots of glass and flat riveted aluminum siding. I actually enjoy towing a TT instead of a fifth wheel as it gets better mileage and is very stable because of the hitch.

    reply
  • Rose Mead

    I saw that you reviewed the Winnebago View M. But have you looked at all their other floor plans? I especially like the View 24V. I like everything about it except the couch. But my husband and I thought about taking it out and putting in two chairs (if they will fit). Otherwise its a good fit for us. We do have concerns about the reliability of the Mercedes engines since they do have frequent problems. I know the diesel engine can have a long life but I’ve heard of other issues. One that concerns me is that Mercedes requires a low or no biodiesel fuel. Which is not always easy to find. Any thoughts on this model?

    reply
  • charlotte Miller

    I enjoyed your video. I am a senior female on disabliity and I want to sell my house and live in an RV.
    I don’t know where to begin my shopping. Can you recomment a book for me to study and learn and is and outs of buying an RV? I also have two cats and would need room for a small piano.
    Is that even a possibility? I am a musician and I guess I could get a keyboard.
    Just wanted to ask where do I begin? Thank you so much!

    reply
    • Mation

      Start by going to Rv shows to get an idea of what’s out there then once you decide what size and options start looking for used rvs and when you find the one you want get it inspected
      Good luck.
      one more thing to think about, will you be towing a car so when you want to go somewhere and can’t take the RV or when your RV breaks down? Something to think about

      reply
  • michael

    Thanks Jason, nice website, useful.
    We are entering retirement, committed to a first RV. We expect 90 days at a time type travel. We have done a little homework and believe we want a Class B. But we really like the slide-out option, for comfort when we are parked. Are there Class B with sliders? Who makes them?
    Michael

    reply
  • Iam a single woman 66 and Ive looked around and the prices are so out there…but I understand,just wanted to mention Ive looked on utube..how to live in a car/van/ …ect etc..and came upon the British and the Asian’s new mini RV’s wish we (the US) could do this…they are so cute and compact sorry forgot the names of these new and improved mini RV’s think one British one was for 22,000 pounds? yea but you need to pay for shipping…but still sounds like a better deal than some of the gouging Mammoths…good luck to all…

    reply
  • Herman Vogt

    We have a 2004 Ford E350 V8 Sportsmobile with the penthouse top. 130k miles with a lifetime mileage between 15 and 16 mpg, which includes the Onan generator running on gas from the tank. It was built to our design specifications and provides space for two adults, two large dogs, and a cat. Shortest trip was an overnight; longest was almost 90 days!
    In the driveway and on the road, it looks like most every other van. Great option for the minimalist RVer.

    reply
  • Libby swingle

    Tell me about the Coach House line

    reply
  • Rain

    Just wanted to say thanks. There are a lot of RV reviews out there skewed to the vacation/camper buyer which don’t go into things like “Can I shower in this without needing a chiropractor afterward?” and “Where do we put the litter box?” Since we have a family member whose business folded leaving him with less than $30,000 to start over, it’s good to get an idea of what features he should consider and the very real possibility of having to live in whatever he buys for some time while he saves up for something larger. Quite a number of people these days need to know about livability and durability rather than flash and dash. Nicely done.

    reply
  • mike jones

    Sorry about the “screwing US buyers” I should have said taking advantage of US buyers. It seems that five or six dealers have the whole US tied up. Used ones are also way high and I’m wondering why so many have so few miles on them. Even one year old ones only have a couple thousand miles and most 4 and 5 years old only have from 5000 to 20,000 miles on them. What would a good rule of thumb for each year in depreciation. What are the major problems that owners have. We had an 05 40 ‘ Beaver w/ 3 slides

    Thank you

    reply
  • mike jones

    I have a crazy question. Looking at Leisure Travel Murphy Bed Van, In the US it seems all the dealer are holding the price on new and used at a ridiculous price. I checked Canadian dealers and there price is about the same. The problem I see is that the difference in the dollar to Canadian dollar is $.31 . In other words a $100,000.00 dollar RV in Canada should be $70,000.00 us. There is no import fees or duty on it. The dealers in the us are making 2 times full mark-up We are in Washington and not that far from dealers in Canada. Is there a reason why the US dealers are screwing the US buyers?

    reply
  • Valerie Tootoosis Bull

    I rved extensively with a # of VW pop up campers in the day with my 2 sons and occasional friend – now I raise my grandchildren – want a toilet a shower if possible but small – what do you see available in Canada

    reply
  • Marion and Betty Culpepper

    We have traveled over 60000 miles in our Roadtrek 210 and love it because it is so easy to drive and can stop anywhere. We even use it to go on short trips for the weekend.

    reply
  • Sarahjane Dooley

    Where is your review of the Dodge/Mercedes Sprinter Chasis ? We think we would like a used one, but haven’t found enough on line to help us make a decision. Your videos are really helpful (and fun). Please keep shopping for all of us!

    reply
  • Dan

    Hello,
    You too are great…amazing production and humor & more….greatly appreciated.
    I am a disabled person who needs to live out of an RV pretty soon; so, I have time to shop. It’s just me, so I don’t need much. I’ve been watching videos on Roadtrek’s Rangers 170, and a few other small(est) class B’s out there. The size is fine with me. Last year I had to live out of my minivan, so this will be a huge step up. I’d love & appreciate your opinions on the best small Class B’s out there please. I would love to buy used…few years old, mid-range mileage, and the basics really. So, price, reliability, reputation and simplicity are what I’m looking for. Please help me narrow this down. THANK YOU!

    reply
  • JoHanna

    Loved your article. Great information….

    reply
  • Tamara

    Hello, you suggested at the beginning of the article that the Dodge/Mercedes Sprinter Chasis was the best. Is it safe to assume that the RV’s you suggested for Mary have that type of Chasis?

    reply
  • Teena Cornelius

    I like the, The Transformer: Leisure Travel Vans U24MB. When you make the bed down is the bed a queen bed. What is the price for this one. Where is the closest one that I can check out nearest Bellingham, WA I am very interested.
    Thank you for your time.

    reply
  • Dr. Louis A. Zagar

    By all means, please look at the Coachmen Clipper 17FQ. We searched for a compact, GOOD, ROOMY, two person Travel Trailer that had a number of MUST HAVE items. The Clipper was the ONLY one that had everything we looked for. FULL bath with separate tubbed shower, separate toilet and vanity/sink with upper and lower storage; FULL queen walk-around bed with ample side and above bed (and below bed) storage; Roomy kitchen with lots of counter space; Very nice and NOT cramped dinette with large viewing window and storage above as well a under seats); Full pass-through storage that will actually fit a big folded chair; And finally, very well constructed and great workmanship. Easy to tow, great sound system, A/C/ Water heater and NON dorm fridge with freezer (works GREAT). Could not be happier.

    reply
  • Mary M

    We just purchased a 2016 Forest River (Coachman) Orien with a Dodge Promaster 24.6 ft. So far we love it. Has the power and the full size queen bed lowers from the ceiling. The sofa makes into a full bed and there are 2 additional chairs and table.

    reply
  • Dorothy Potter, Hillsborough, NC

    Thank you.
    This is a really great site.
    I had so many spell errors and too quickly hit send and did not choose ” notify me when responses made ” saw that as it was sending…. would be great to have an edit button to go back. This IPAD keyboard does not like me..

    reply
  • threepines

    Just to throw another model in the mix – a couple of weeks ago we purchased a 22-ft Pleasure-Way Pursuit. Ours has a u-shaped dinette in the rear that makes into a queen, as well as a trundle bed that slides out over the driver’s cabin. What sold us was the separate shower, contemporary interior (no granny upholstery), LED lighting, interior 6’8″ headroom & the Ford E350 chassis (didn’t need/want diesel). Found it at a SC RV dealer, a 3-year-old model with 1000 miles that had sat in the owner’s company warehouse after a couple of trips. We’re in the process right now of taking off ALL the swirly decals and RV markings so that it can pass as a silver utility van when we’re done, better for going stealth.

    reply
    • Dorothy Potter, Hillsborough, NC

      Could yountell us the name of the dealer
      Could yountell us what yiur research has shown to be a fair price for a used vehicle similiar to yours?
      Will do our homework…but we just started to look ( like yesterday!! )

      And last…where do you go to remove the decals…auto body shop??

      Good luck and great travels with yiur new ride!

      reply
  • Nowzar Ardalan

    I love your videos! So much positive energy!! Now to the main question: I just watched the review you had of the three small RVs. You both were pretty good about comparing features and build quality, etc. What about reliability? I am looking at Class B RVs and have noticed so many companies are building RVs on Mercedes Sprinter platform. I have heard nightmare stories about especially he diesel models’ breakdowns and super expensive repairs mostly related to the complex exhaust system. Have you or anyone else on this site heard or knows about such problems?

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  • erich

    We have a 26p Vista Winnebago. Banks power, all windows dual MCD, all LED, air ride, dual heaters, propane and heat exchanger. 28k miles, Also solar power additions, . It’s been the best. We are selling it with low Onan 74hours. New tires, brakes, etc.

    reply
    • Robin

      Have you sold it yet, in the market for one. Price? Pics? Location?

      reply
    • frank

      Hello, Where are you? And how much are you asking?

      reply
  • S T Belding

    Is there a used value resource like NADA book for small & medium size RVs?
    Keep up the great work, this is terrific information. Best regards, Steve

    reply
    • I believe so, but I think it may only be to the trade so you’ll need to have a friend in the industry to get a hold of it.

      reply
  • I know the Wynns are on a boat now, but if you like the Winnebago View, you should consider the Forest River Solera. We were considering the View or the Itasca Navion (and we do love the contemporary interiors of those), but the Solera beats both of those in functionality and storage – hands down. There are huge exterior storage bays in the Solera, and our 24R model has a slide-out queen bed in the back. Check it out!

    reply
  • papa

    class B with Japanese engine?

    reply
  • Valarie

    I’m contemplating purchasing a Class B motorhome. In your opinion, are the Mercedes Benz models the best all around quality on the market? Also, is there a Class B motorhome on the market that would offer 1 full size bed, a recliner and a couch that is big enough to convert into a full size bed? Of course, I still want the galley, the bath/shower, convection microwave, refrigerator, solar powered air conditioning/heat, ,lots of storage, etc., etc., etc.? I’d prefer a 2016 vehicle with all of the above conveniences for no more than $90,000.00.

    One more thing: are there sites like CarFax to locate Class B motorhomes?

    reply
  • Arlen

    Thanks for the info.. I have a question.. does anyone know of a Camper (like Nissan manufactures in the UK but with the driver on the left) that has a small kitchen, bathroom and sleeping but is not much longer than an suv?

    reply
  • Karen Blamey

    I am just beginning to research these travel vans and your site gave me tons of info and things to think about. The estimated prices are great too…as no other sites seem to want to approach costs.

    reply
  • Grace

    Love your videos! Thanks for all the great info!

    reply
  • Carole Potereiko

    I would like to know for the money which older Class B Motor Homes are the Best Buy

    reply
  • Carole Potereiko

    This is a great site I’ve learned a whole lot Thanks.

    reply
  • bill drake

    the best of older class b motorhomes[ info please]

    reply
  • Rebecca Young

    looking for a Used Tear Drop for no more then 2 people with AC. used Eastern part of US.

    reply
  • Michele Jean

    You mentioned a “wet bath” in the Sportsman Sprinter, but I see no bathroom in the floor plan. I am a single senior, looking for an affordable stealth RV or van that I can stand up in, to visit family in all four corners of America. With very limited resources, I would need it to be very fuel efficient and mechanically sound, with good remaining tire tread (as I couldn’t afford to replace tires right away.)

    reply
  • Michele Jean

    You mentioned a “wet bath” in the Sportsman Sprinter, but I see no bathroom in the floor plan.

    reply
  • Elizabeth W

    Thank you so much, very informative. Can you post again when you decide and blog you’re experience peraps?

    reply
  • Ramona

    I love the Adria compact campers out of the U.K……too bad they don’t sell them here 🙁 🙁

    reply
  • WC Story

    What a nice resource! Thank you for informative and thoughtful ideas.

    reply
  • Mar

    Hi very new to this option. Retiring in 2 years. Want something small and able to park discretely along the way. I love the beaches and coastal areas. But will be doing some cross country during summer months. Love reading all this info. Thanks!

    reply
  • Carol McPherson

    I enjoyed watching your video and it was very informative. Thanks for making it. You both were fun to watch and funny too.

    reply
  • Margaret

    Rinds, I am looking at the same situation, pls let me know your findings

    reply
  • Jon Donahue

    I’d look at the Lazy Daze 24’… because they are so well built, like aluminum instead of fiberglass roof and walls. You can only buy new from the factory in LA. RVs are mechanically complex… trying to cram water, gas, and electrical into a rolling box that bounces around over potholes at 60 mph. Lazy Daze has been making the same design for many, many years… evolving rather than re-inventing. So many, many, many little irritating design issues have been fixed over the years… like they were in the car world, on VWs and Model Ts over their 25-year production runs.
    Lazy Daze sweet spot would probably be 3-4 years old, at around $50,000…

    reply
  • Jim

    Check out thevanual.com and imagine the possibilities with this one:

    http://washingtondc.craigslist.org/doc/rvs/5647352935.html

    reply
  • Bob and Martha Gunnoe

    We are long time campers. First in tents, then 27′ 5th wheel, then an Alaska road trip for a month in a Lance truck back camper. Presently we have a 25′ Arctic Fox. All of them have been good quality used, but getting older, we don’t want hitching up or climbing up into a bed. We want a class B with twin beds. Easy to use and relatively economical. We go to mountainous areas and so probably need diesel. We are retired and can spend as much time as we want to travel. Although he does work 2 days a week, we can get off a month at a time. We want a used vehicle. Where do we start! I love the examples you show, but we can’t afford new. Thank you for ANY advise. Martha Gunnoe.

    reply
  • Rinda

    Very interested in your recommendation. Single female, not incompetent but admittingly ignorant regarding mechanics. Four year plan is retirement at age 60 and chase 77 degrees for as long as I can take it. Would like to work/volunteer at state parks while in the area of choice so I can see me pulling a small vehicle (an Elio perhaps). Will want my bicycle and kayak but nothing else big to carry.

    reply
    • India

      Rinda, am thinking along the same lines although considering selling my jewelry in addition to volunteering in my travels. Would love to find out what you think you’ll go with as I am in a similar “boat” so to speak!

      reply
    • Margaret

      How is the hunt going

      reply
  • Lukas in Surrey

    I’m a newbie, really appreciate yr attention to details, and links. Very informative and (the video was) enjoyable to watch, thanks!!

    reply
  • James Bergman

    I appreciate you going through all of these small RV’s. I think they would be perfect for me. They are small enough I won’t be scared of driving them, and they still look really comfortable. Right now I would probably go with the sportsmobile just because it can get to more places and is perfect for overnight camping or biking trips.

    reply
    • Jeanne C-G

      Hi James. Jeanne here. Bought my Sportsmobile (SMB) new in 2004. Been using it ever since to tow my horses for dayrides and for week-long primitive camping. The SMB has been perfect for me and my husband. Didn’t get 4WD like most have because we don’t go where the horse trailer can’t go. Got the V10 gas engine because, while its mileage sucks, if something was to go wrong most auto repair places can work on gassers but not necessarily on diesels. Just wanted to let you know that if you go SMB, in our experience, you can’t go wrong. Have fun!

      reply
  • G Coleman

    Single young senior. Purchased a 3 bedroom home in 2014. I am tired of it after a year. Too much yard work and maintenance. I want to travel. I know I am planning on selling it in another year or two. Do you think a Class b rv would be a good fit for me. I live alone now and not contemplating having anyone living with me except a dog.

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  • Susan Porter

    Hello, My name is Susan. Yes, I would prefer to remain confidential at this time. I have just sold my home, closing this Friday, 5/6/16. I have traveled, currently living in WI. Planning to move to MN for the summer and then AZ. Maybe. I’ve always been interested in RV’ing. I have the opportunity now. Reading your “Blog” was so helpful. I’ve done other reading/research. All of it technical, impersonal and not giving the simple facts I’ve been looking for. Thank You!!!
    I live in a small, backwards, bars and hunting community. Came here for some peace and quiet, READY TO MOVE ON!!!!
    Can I ask where the best places are to look for a good, used, small (like the Incognito or Transformer RV’s)?? I am going to store my belongings for now.
    I have a very well-behaved Yorkshire Terrier. I am concerned about safety issues. I am 53, single, (look much younger.) I’m also not knowledgeable about parking, nighttime, etc., while travelling. Is there an RV’ing For Dummies book or any that you would recommend?
    Are either of you available to speak to on the telephone? Regarding another more serious question? If not, I understand.
    I do hope to hear from you, Thank You,
    SUSAN

    reply
    • D Tate

      There are lots of single solo campers out there these days, including me. I have been a solo camper since 2009 in a 17 foot Casita then a 19 foot scamp 5th wheel.
      I suggest you read some blogs from solo campers, male or female. There are solo groups like sisters on the Fly and loners on wheels. Organizations like escapees probably have a forum for solo campers. Google ‘ RVsue and the K9 crew’ and ‘Interstellar orchard.com’ – both solo female full timers who blog.
      If you are interested in a bumper pull trailer, go to fiberglassrv.com and you will be able to see several brands as well as read the solo Forum there.
      You can do this.
      .

      reply
    • Neena

      Hi Susan…
      I sold my roadtrec a few years ago and it was a very bad decision. I hope to find another slightly used one really soon; we loved the lifestyle. Great fun.

      reply
  • Anne Bay

    I watch ch. 245 on Frontier and they have programs on RV’s. One particular program had a lot of pratical information on traveling in RV’s. One point they make is not to sell your home though. This is a program primarily aimed at senior citizens. The issue is that if you get sick, need regular doctor visits, or just can’t travel any more, you will need to go home. So, I am wondering if it’s a wise decision to sell your home in order to live in an RV. I am sure it depends on what the situation is of the person who wants to live in an RV and their financial set-up. One point this couple made was that they use an RV park in Florida as their base when they travel, but they have their home also, as they don’t plan to permanently live in the RV. They also go home for their medical check-ups and to conduct business. I don’t think they travel all year either. Just thought I would share this bit of info. I would like to have a small RV to travel with when we can afford it. I haven’t seen Yellowstone and other places. However, we would have to buy a used RV on our budget. I enjoyed reading this article about small RV’s very much-very well presented and easy to understand!

    reply
  • Roger

    Anyone considering a motor home, even a very small one must consider the road ability and economy of the vehicle. I’ve owned several including large ones and my favorite, a Rialto (no longer in production) with a VW 6 cylinder got 21 miles per gal. Most of the others struggled to get 12 MPG. I understand the new small motor homes with diesel engine get up to 26 MPG. The down side of almost all motor homes is they can be monsters on a windy day. Also, they can be a handful when passing or being passed by trucks especially if it is windy.

    reply
  • Mary scott

    Thanks for sharing we are just starting the process to search for a small motorhome. It was a great tour

    reply
  • David Dancho

    Wellllll… Maybe we could get an RV, but you don’t really need one

    reply
  • bj

    where is the best place to buy a used b+ or c class? I am in Austin TX.

    reply
  • Tanya

    I saw you both on an HGTV episode. Happy to know things are still working out well for your traveling adventure. Good luck and enjoy your freedom of the (long) road trip. 🙂

    reply
  • Nancy Darling

    What are the pros and cons of an all electric class B or propane and electric?
    Enjoy your comparisons.

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  • Kim

    For a single smaller sized person, full timing, in a used B + is an excellent deal. Works for couples for weekend camping. Recommend 2 slide outs minimum. If I were married or had a family, minimum class C with 3 slides. You need to be comfortable if it rains for a couple of days straight.;). Class B+ and C are easy on the pocketbook and allow room to move around in. The less length = more camping opportunities, esp. in national forests and the like. Repairs, gas and maintaince are easy on the pocketbook compared to class A’s. They are much easier to drive and more fun. I can park in any parking lot and do U turns. 2006 Gulf Stream BT Cruiser 5250 owner

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  • Bob Montgomery

    Recently I saw a video on television for the new “Trek” Class A Motorhome (yes a class a!) with the most awesome idea for a bed in the back I have ever seen! Its almost like getting a 31′ motorhome in a 24′ package with more space than my Class C by far. I don’t have a dealer anywhere near Cody WY where I live but I would love to get your thoughts on the amazing motorhome… I have been following your posts for a while now are really respect your opinions. Come to Cody sometime! It is a wonderful place for RV travel. So much to see and do, including Yellowstone Park which is only 45 miles away. People come from all over the world to visit the Buffalo Bill Museum…so large it takes two days to go through it and there is a rodeo seven days a week during the tourist season (don’t expect too much in the winter lol.)…Keep up the fine work.

    reply
  • mary dugger

    what are your thoughts on the Thor Citation 24sr with the bed hard side slide out on the rear?? we have been looking at this long and hard as you can extend a 24′ motorhome to a 29′ or so when parked seems like a really nice choice we were originally thinking on a truck camper but hate the thought of climbing in and out of the bed at my age…do you have any feed back for me on this motorhome??

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  • John Gregg

    We owned a 1974 VW basic Westfalia before children and loved it. Now retired, we would like a similar vehicle. We’re wilderness campers so we don’t need more than a teardrop might provide. Any suggestions?

    reply
  • Melanie

    Great information. I am looking to move into a van. So, I can travel to see kids and grandkids without imposing myself on them. I’ve lived the “so called American dream” for long enough. It is not what it’s cracked up to be. You are stuck in one place for years. Working a job you hate to live in a house you are tired of maintaining. Paying property tax, Homeowners insurance etc. It just does not make any sense to me anymore. Why not have the freedom to come and go as you like while you take your home with you each time. Save tons of money on traveling expense. Hotel fees. Eating out. We could live so much cheaper the we currently do.

    reply
    • paula

      Hey
      just ran across your post and am in much the same spot in life as you. Did you purchase a van to travel/live in? I am contemplating selling my home and doing the full-time lifestyle. My family are spread out everywhere, but i need MY space when I visit
      .

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      • michelle

        Me too, Paula. Havent listed my house yet, but looking forward to the flexibility and adventure of being in a Class B. I’ll be traveling alone with my dog and I’m a senior, so the idea of hooking/unhooking anything seems like too much work.

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  • George Kobernus

    Surprised you did not review the Coachman Platinum series. Under 30 feet, more upscale but with 2 slides really livable for a couple.

    Go to: http://www.coachhouserv.com/

    Not a shill for the company, just a satisfied owner.

    reply
    • Wolf Alaska

      I think George meant to write Coachmen Platinum, but actually the Platinum is a model of RV made by Coach House, Inc.
      George has the correct web site link to Coach House shown in his post.

      reply
  • I am looking for a park and sleep style RV that has at least a Queen size bed. Looking for comfort when your 6’5″ is proving to be difficult. I do not want any set up or pull out sections.

    Any suggestions? I have just started my RV adventure.

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  • FrankG

    Love the videos, you all offer great points. I’m new to RV’s and seriously thinking of getting a small Class A. Actually the Flair was on my short list (no pun intended) to investigate further.
    My concern is normal wear on a house may need calking etc. RV’s are moving, by their nature, how common are leaks around windows, doors etc?

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  • John T.

    Thanks for all the information on Class B, and B+, and small Class C RV/Motor-homes. I have been interested in the Road Trek models. They seem well-outfitted and easy to operate, but quite small and very expensive, when fully equipped. Do have any sense of whether these machines are worth the price? They certainly look nice.

    reply
  • Arun s

    We are proud to say this Motorhome is one of the best investments in transportation my wife and I have made. At the moment I’ve (she won’t drive it) put 50k+ miles on it. She’s overwhelmed by its size because anything larger than a minivan is challenging on a personal level.
    Ours is a class C, 2006 Itasca Navion which is the twin of a Winnebago View. The Mercedes Sprinter 5cyl. Turbo Diesel is the one under our hood. It’s strong features are torque, power, versatility, great mileage, 18/23 mpg in mixed fwy/street combo conditions. Easy to back up, park, turn on a dime with a great ride, driving pleasure, visibility and ease of maintenance/service. Cost for the amount of versatile features with the comfort and convenience is very modest. Parking/storage requires a bit more than your larger garage or driveway. Costs us 30’bucks/mo. for secured, walled in surveillance parking. Works out great.
    Washing it can be a challenge if you don’t have access to high bays in your DIY Weiss guys or similar drive through car wash. I’m lucky enough to have that kind of access a mile from home. The more times you do it the more creative you’ll get. I use my own long reach light weight retractable washer wand, spotless soap/wax with their power wash for a squeaky clean rinse. I then dry it off by driving the RV a couple of miles on the freeway to blow water off of it. The spot free final rinse helps to dry it this way. I barely have to hand dry it, perhaps just the mirrors.
    Let me tell you, this beast is a keeper. It’s really fun to drive but you have to treat it with a kind of respect for its size that’s beyond a car or SUV standard mentality. One with a bit more respect/regard and class. Thats the only distinction I will hesitatingly make for the driver.
    Other than that, enjoy, have a blast and travel to places and do things you only dreamed of thus far.
    G’Luck & Happy Travels!

    reply
  • How do feel about the hard sided popups like Trailmanor?

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  • Dave

    I like your candidness in your videos. My wife and I are considering a C class motor home. I have looked to no avail at many sites and YouTube for information about the comfort of extra adults riding in them for lengths of time. We have 2 adult daughters and their spouses that we would love to take with us on extended road trips. Trips that may be several hours or a few hundred miles to the beach, etc. We wouldn’t necessarily be all staying in the RV for length of time – more for just getting there. What is it like for adults to ride behind the cockpit? Many of these have side facing couches, dinettes, no real “seats” although seat belted. Have you taken friends and family with you? What is their reaction to the ride? If you could point me to a resource it would be most appreciated. Perhaps just renting one to see may be only option. Thanks.

    reply
    • Arun s

      Hi Dave,
      Great idea if you can rent one of these. Read my review on our RV and after almost one decade of owning and enjoying it, it’s the one I truly recommend.
      If you have larger extra adults, consider towing a rentable pop up/tent trailer. This will give you additional sleeping space when traveling. Yes,we did our diligent homework prior to purchasing ours. In retrospect, we are really glad we did it on several levels such as cost, value, serviceability/cost, durability and of course resale value etc. Obviously that last one just ain’t gonna happen, if you get my drift.
      Hope this helps. Admittedly I’d be mildly curious for feedback on what you ended up with. G’Luck!

      reply
  • Serena

    I’m looking for a used class b for under $15K that gets at least 15 mpg. Is that realistic? Any suggestions?

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  • Rizale B. Dizon

    My husband and I are interested in a small used RV for travelling and camping. Any leads?
    Thank you.

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  • Elaine and Bil Freeman-Eckstein

    Sold our RV because Bill got Parkinson Disease and had trouble with upkeep. Looking for a tiny RV like a Teardrop, used.Thank you for any referral.

    reply
  • Elaine and Bil Freeman-Eckstein

    We sold our Winnebago Vew because we needed the money and miss it terribly. In addition, my husband developed Parkinson disease and so now we are very tied down.He can drive but cannot walk well. We are looking for a tiny RV -like a Teardrop. used. Then we can travel. Any leads?

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  • Bob and Carol Wert

    We are just beginning to look for a class B,B plus or small C.. We have had fifth wheels for years, we r needing a smaller unit for some trips, this helps us a lot thanks so much for this info…

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  • TJ

    Hey thanks for the video. I was wondering if you have seen the Evan Mini-RV? I’ve only been able to find a picture of it, but I think it looks great and is my ideal RV. I am interested in an RV that has the cockpit sitting high like a Class A but want it short and maneuverable, maybe around 24 ft in length. Not sure of the specifics of the Evan but it appears to me that it’s less than 30 ft long. This is a big step up for me as I am a die-hard VW Vanagon guy. 🙂

    reply
  • The Best Small RV

    […]I can’t always put a finger on it but I never was a huge fan of these cars, especially when they switched over to the oil burning 4.6. The doors always open and close with a tinny clunk that reminded me of my 1979 Fairmont. The steering was alway…

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  • bill durfee

    looking for class b used 20000.oo or less

    reply
  • Marty

    We just now downsizes and went to a 24′ Lazy Daze out of Montclair CA. We went on a 1 month outing and never missed the extra space. Wish now we would have gotten the rear beds as you would never have to make up the beds. Metallic paint is beautiful. Inside has more space as they have 1/2 benches for eating. They are reasonable and we got over 10 miles to the gal and went on a lot of mountains.

    reply
    • Sylvia

      We just sold our 1996 Lazy Daze 30IB. LOVED having the dedicated bedroom. We lived in it for 5 yrs when not on the road and the bedroom gave us each our own space. Ours had 188k miles on it when sold and we are the 2nd owner having put 145K miles on it. Looking for a pre owned B or possibly just doing traveling & camping in our van.

      reply
  • Loretta Horowitz

    I would like to find a RV that that fits me as Grandmother and a single woman, one that I can share with my son, my daughter-law and my two grandsons. Something that’s easy for me to drive, but has enough room for all of us, should we decide to travel together. I would like an RV that is stress free and enjoyable to drive, but large enough for their growing family. The boys are 6 and 8, and are growing fast, so something that they will not out grow to soon. I’m considering the new 2016 Winnebago 24J with Mercedes/ Sprinter with Diesel engine. Do you think this could work for us?

    reply
  • cindy williams

    Thanks so much for the info. I’m looking for options that would work for my husband and I. He does not trust my driving (lol) with anything very long ,I dont either!!! I will not always be traveling with him. Some of these ideas sound great. I did a google search and found your info on the first page. Was so glad to read the research that someone has already done!

    Thanks,
    Cindy Williams
    Morro Bay, Ca

    reply
  • Caroline

    Hi-
    I am a young professional who will be working remotely on the east coast for my west coast based company. I plan to work 6 months out of the year on Block Island (small island off the coast of Rhode Island) and 6 months in San Diego. Due to the difficulty in finding a place to rent that does not lock me into a lease I am exploring alternate options. I would also like the flexibility to drive back and forth across the country and elsewhere. I would need something small and able to park anywhere as well as affordable. I am 25 and don’t have a ton of money to spend. I would also need something with enough room to make the RV a home office as well. Any suggestions would be much appreciated!
    Thanks-
    Caroline

    reply
    • Hey Caroline,

      Are you currently living on Block Island? I’m 29 living in east greenwich looking to transition into rv living and thought it would be cool to meet other like mined individuals. Have you spotted any RV that stood out to you?

      -Chad

      reply
  • Tim

    I am looking for a motorhome (preferably new, under 70K, probably B or C). I currently have a 24′ travel trailer, and since my wife passed away, I want to move into something I can operate myself. Besides the basic amenities, the features I am referring to are a unit that has ample storage, easy to clean, has electronic self leveling capabilities, something I can easily empty, flush out, and clean the waste tanks by myself, and an electric awning I can roll out and retract by myself. I have friends that can help me when I camp with my group, but am looking for something I can operate by myself when necessary. Thanks for any advice.

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  • becky p.

    I am a single women of 65 , I know nothing about motor homes other than I would like to buy a used small motor home in a price range of ten thousand to twenty five thousand. Where can one go to find such a thing? Do they not make them in this country? Thanks

    reply
    • Roger

      Becky, I don’t know if you’ve purchased yet but be careful. It is difficult to find a good used motor home under $30,000. One I owned and really liked was the Winnebago Rialto which has been out of production (sadly) for a few years, but was the best small motor home I ever owned or encountered. It is on a Volkswagon chasis and has a Volkswagon V6 engine which is an excellent engine. A very nice (and mechanically sound) one can be purchased for about $25,000.00. (Note: look for a low mileage one, under 50,000 miles) The Rialto is also a pleasure to drive and very safe, plus it is only 21 ft long and can be parked in a standard size parking space (rare for a motor home) PS: I am also a senior, over 70 who knows motorhomes

      reply
  • Karen Crick

    my husband and I r retired, with family in OR, wA, Mt, CO. We r looking to find a motor home with a drop down or in the back queen bed as we have a sleep number mattress and r not wanting to give it up. What is the shortest length of RV that they make with this type of bed. Also would like to have a chair but don’t need a table to eat at.

    reply
  • Jean Sims

    I am a widowed grandmother who is saving her money to buy a used class B or C RV. There are places I want to see while I still can. I would like to find a consultant that I can hire to help me find and check out a used RV that I might want to buy, in the same way a person can have a realtor to help buy a house. I am not experienced in that type of thing, but I shy away from RV salesmen who want to sell me something. Have you ever heard of a consultant like that?

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    • Lisa

      Jean,
      I’m curious if you found someone to help you with your purchase. I’m in the same position and simply cannot afford to get ripped off.

      reply
  • Mike Olsen

    Hi my name is Mike.I am a married Anglican priest, I was recently diagnosed with a terminal lung disease. I have a desire to travel and make myself available to churches to bring a message of hope during lifes difficult struggles.I know this sounds crazy but…do you think a Rv dealer or company would donate a class B for me to travel with my wife and 4 dogs to bring hope to people with terminal illnesses? Just a thought…I dont know how long I have but I’d like to bless people with the time I have left!

    reply
    • I honestly have no idea as that isn’t an area we would know anything about nor have any experience with. I have not ever heard of any of the RV companies donating an RV but it doesn’t mean it couldn’t happen.

      reply
  • Trace

    We are retiring soon and just beginning our motorhome search (under 30 feet). We plan on traveling with two cats. Do any of the motorhomes have a convenient location for a permanent cat litter box (out of the way and secure)?

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  • IVAN

    WYNN FAMILY

    Thank you for sharing. My wife and I are looking at retiring in the next couple of years and before we start our new career we want to take a year off and just travel the USA in an RV. We have spent most of our life oversea and we are looking forward to exploring and enjoying the country we so much love. Looking for any recommendations, the RV will be our home of a year.

    Thank you

    IM

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  • Allen

    17′ Toyota Sunrader…fiberglass shell rear duallys 17 -20mpg city /highway

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  • Sarah

    Any ideas on a RV under 30ft. that sleeps 6 in beds comfortably? I’d really like to not have to make the table into a bed every night:)
    We have 3 young kids and want something with good gas milage. Also something that looks youngerish:) as we are nowhere near retiring yet.

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    • Pat

      We just bought an Itasca Viva and love it. There’s an electric loft bed that drops down (and up out of the way during the day) and a fixed corner bed. Make up the dinette and you have space for six. There are seatbelts for six as well. It’s on a Dodge ProMaster chassis (gas) and is easy to drive.

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        • Pat

          True, there is only 2,000 pounds of towing capacity on the Viva. We migrated from a 2009 Winnebago ERA on a Sprinter chassis (which has 6,000 pounds of towing capacity) and had a 36 foot 2003 diesel pusher before that. We found that we never towed with the ERA (towing adds a lot of time to hook and unhook and one of the reasons we loved with the Sprinter was that we could go anywhere, park anywhere and fill up anywhere which is much more difficult while towing). The Viva is small enough to “tear down” very quickly (no slides to worry about) and drive to wherever you need to go. What did it for us was the sleeping space for our 6 and 10 year old. And getting that bed up and out of the way during the day is really cool.

          I agree with you though that you do have to take into consideration what you’ll be carrying and what you’ll be towing, if anything. We didn’t intend to switch motorhomes but when we saw the Viva at a show in Hershey we really liked it. The ERA and its close but much more expensive cousin the Airstream Interstate that you have reviewed here are great for two people but becomes an expensive van for hotel stays or tent trips for those with kids.

          I really like your selections. The View and the Leisure Van murphy bed model were two I had looked at before when we started thinking about changing. The nice thing about the Viva was that it was significantly cheaper ($80K) than something built on a Sprinter.

          Thanks.

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  • carrie

    Hi gang…very great day to find you. My situation is a bit different in that we have 3 dogs and 1 cat in our life. And yes, I am going to buy a smaller rv to eventually live in…right now I am just convincing my hubby that this is a good idea for
    ‘Bugging out’…..my problem is ;
    ‘Where can we live’ with dogs that need a fenced in area around the camper……
    How do you people handle your pets? Mine must be contained as I would go mental if they were not…..and they have always lived in a fenced large yard.
    I am looking at a class b+ 24ft…it seems huge and I want the over front seat part for clothes storage…Do any of you do that?
    Happy trails to all!
    Carrie

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    • Dori

      We lived on the road for about a year, with one German Shepherd. He stayed indoors unless we were out, there were plenty of places to walk to exercise him, but inside he earned the nickname “speedbump” because when you live in a hallway (no slideouts) wherever he laid was where my feet needed to be!
      At one campground, people had 3 Pomeranians that spent part of their day in the patch of grass next to the camper contained in a baby gate/playyard setup. You must be there with them at all times when they are outside-no leaving for shopping or sightseeing. If your dogs are barkers, this is NOT advisable as a group of us eventually had them thrown out of the campground for relentless barking!

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  • AL

    I am a recently retired senior living in Cocoa Beach, FL and I too been thinking about full time RV living and traveling. There is much information here and I thank the Wynns and all the folks for all the excellent feedback.

    I have been researching for a class B vehicle to maybe 30′ or so with a higher mpg, maybe a diesel. Will research all the good info from here and the good advice. One request, please include a website when recommending a vehicle if you can thank you.

    Best wishes to the Wynns and thank you for this great website/blog. Perhaps we shall meet out yonder…

    Be safe and have fun!!!

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  • J William

    Hey guys, big ups to the awesome work you’ve put on this site! Can’t believe I haven’t found this before. I’ve always wanted to live in a van. Obviously I’d love to get one of these vans, but golly they are pricey! I know these prices are for new vehicles. Anyway, I need a class B that has a toilet and shower since I’m going to live in it. Ideally the sports mobile, but I won’t be too picky.

    I haven’t read through all the comments to see if any of my questions have been answered, so here are a few.
    -What are the best sites other than craigslist to find a used van?
    -What are good reliable used vans in the below $10,000 range?
    -$10,000 to $30,000 range?
    -What are the most reliable vans that break down the least and require little maintenance other than basic fluid changes and tire?

    Thanks so much for the help, you guys rock!

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  • RLW

    Greetings, I have been planning rv living for four years. I made a purchase based on a decision to live 3-4 months at a time- an Airstream (towable) trailer as an initial phase in potentially moving to full-timing.

    I have looked at the Interstate, the View and the Leisure travel vans at shows. They are certainly nice; however, something often overlooked is the storage space. foot by foot a trailer of the same size has more storage and space. I focused on 26′ models at the last show comparing Class A, C and towables and found this to be true, especially when considering the truck bed storage area.

    Another consideration is the interval of time. Full time living in an Interstate would be difficult IMO. Even in my current selection it would be confining but doable in a pinch. My researching has found that 32-35′ with opposing slides and W&D would be optimum.

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    • Totally understandable and sounds like you are figuring your situation out nicely. However, remember that what seems doable or not to you may be completely different to someone else. That is what is so great and so difficult about all of this. It’s all based on everyone’s individual wants and needs. We do know people that live full time in the interstate and smaller! As for us, while we absolutely love some of the cool trailers we don’t want to drive a pickup truck around so we prefer a derivable with a small tow car.

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  • Jane Klein

    Hi Jason, so I’m wondering if you know any east coast (I live in New York) companies that rent this size rv or any rv appropriate for 1 person travel. I have never gone rv-ing, and have no experience at all, but have an allergy to scented and fragranced products which has made hotel stay impossible. I am 43, and haven’t done any traveling in years. My dog died last year, after a long and very expensive battle with cancer, and before I get another I thought I’d try to take a road trip. However last year I drove down to florida and found that this fragrance issue had become such a problem for me, that I can no longer count on renting rooms from others. I am very poor, so cost is definitely an issue. I am on disability, which is less then my rent, but am determined to take this trip. I think renting a small rv might be the only way I can do it. Any suggestions?

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    • Jane,
      Renting is not cheap although I do know there are some good deals out there. I would start your searchh by reaching out to the RV rental companies first to see if they are running any specials or discounts. Other than that you can pick up a trailer for a small investment if you want to “get your feet wet” without a large investment. Best part is you can sell the trailer after your trip should you decide the RV lifestyle is not for you.
      Hope this helps get you started.

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    • Jaime

      If you look around Craigslsit you can find cheap teardrop trailers that can be towed with even a compact size car. It’s a really cheap way to get into a rv! They can be used for trips or even living in them full time as some people do that. Renting one would probably be more expensive than buying one depending on how long you plan on being on the road.

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  • Linda

    I’ve been drawn to Advanced RV… I’m not sure the quality for a Class B (their specialty) can be surpassed: advanced-rv.com

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  • Elk

    2014/2015 Leisure Travel Van Free Spirit SS. leisurevans.com/freespiritss/video.html#anchor

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  • Joe

    I have a 1996 Explorer Class B camper. My wife and I have camped at many campgrounds and dry camped many times. We traveled from Maryland to Florida staying at campgrounds and dry camping and were away for close to a month. Most times we camp for only a week or two at a stretch. My friends that have campers all have Class A campers. All I ever hear is how can you stay in something that small or why don’t you get something bigger? I have never felt crowded or inconvenienced in our Class B. Just saying!!!

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    • bassplyr2

      Hi, I was advised not to get a van from the 1990s because they would be expensive and hard to fix. What is your experience?

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  • Dale Monroe

    We travel in a short 2006 Sprinter Van pulling a 2008 17 foot Airstream Safari Sport Trailer. We averaage 18 mpg driving 57 mph. The trailer is perfect for us two retirees. The couch folds into a bed. I expanded the stock bed, adding an extra four foot couch cushion on the side. The bed is now plenty wide for two adults and a twenty pound dog. The bath has a separate toilet, shower and sink. The table must be folded and put away. I don’t mind taking ten minutes to set up the bed and five minutes to set up the table. When camping, we’re not counting the minutes.

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  • Capt. Billy

    Ahoy’
    DIESEL VERSES GAS ((*j*))
    Both do very well but for the ladies it’s a big NO-NO !
    ie: Diesel is like beer it foams up and gets on your shoes, then on your carpet and stinks up your RV world! Although not every Diesel
    pump has a puddle. My family purchased a new $$$$ Mercedes Benz and Mother got foamed and the beautiful MB was banished
    for ever, End of story~

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    • ccrreilly

      I love this story..I was think the same thing, and I feel it is harder to find diesel .

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      • David

        My wife, two cats and I have been traveling full time since 5/3/2014 in a 2012 Great West Vans 24′ Sprinter. The diesel engine is lovely–quiet, torquey, odor-free. I’m getting about 19 mpg if I drive below 60. Mercedes diesels are workhorses; they are designed as true commercial vehicles, and with proper maintenance, should outlast gasoline engines by multiples. Don’t not get a diesel because you might step in a diesel puddle. (Seriously?) and unless you’re looking for another excuse not to buy one, know that finding diesel stations in the United States is as easy as finding a McDonalds.

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  • Greg B

    I’m a teacher but am tired of the classroom but too young to retire. Any ideas how I might make a living on the road in a regency gt24mb?

    reply
    • You should check out our Make money and travel series to get some ideas! https://www.gonewiththewynns.com/category/make-money-travel

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    • Capt. Billy

      Ahoy’
      Greg B the teacher~~Go stand in the corner and think a bit~~Get the RV and a new life style.
      Sell used cars for $300~ a pop. Do the math that’s
      thirty cars a mo. and in like Flin or try a music grinder and a fake monkey to go with Gipsy dreams.
      How’s that from a high school drop out !

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      • Greg B

        Thanks for the tip captain my captain!!

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        • ccrreilly

          Oh..this makes me sad now

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  • mary jane getter

    Hey guys, I have been following you for some time but have not posted a comment yet . I enjoy your site and also follow you on FB. We plan to go full time in the next 6 months. We are shopping for a bigger motor home but not lager than 30 ft. We found a 2011 Avanti 2806 model with a very interesting floor plan. I know you guys owned an Avanti at one time. Was that the lemon you spoke of in one of your posts? How do you like the front end diesel vs the rear end one like Roy? You help would be so appreciated.
    Thanks, Mary Jane and Chuck

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  • A word of warning about Sprinters. In 2005, I leased 3 new Sprinter(mercedes) cab chasis vans with a 14 ft box and used them to deliver bread for 4 years. It was a nightmare of engine lights coming on, lights blowing, and difficulty getting service for this specialized vehicle. I ended up putting 4 transmissions in over the 4 years. The warranty covers only the first 100,000 km, way too low for a commercial truck.(especially considering the price).
    I have to admit it was very comfortable for the driver while he waited for the tow truck but for an owner, it was a major headache and the main reason I would never ever buy any sprinter anywhere for any amount of money.
    I had tried to do my research on the internet before I leased these Sprinters but found nothing bad. A few years later I was just casually glancing through the vehicle section of Consumers Reports and found very high repair incidences for most Mercedes cars in the transmission/drive train section. It confirmed what I already knew: Apparently, Mercedes can’t build a reliable transmission.

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    • Thanks for sharing your experiences with everyone. I know several people that are big fans of the sprinter vans but I know everyone’s experience is different so it’s nice to hear about all sides.

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  • pam

    I need some good advice on these class Bs,,,I have been looking at roadtreks,,,and pleasure ways,,,chochmen rvs and have only 20,000 dollars to buy one. I have found some rams cheaper but I was thinking chevys holds up best,,,could someone tell me if chrysler or ford or what in a class b holds up best,,,,as I will be living in this rv with very low income and cant take a huge mistake,,,thank you and GOD BLESS

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    • Pam, we have not done much research in the way of used class B’s … so I am going to ask our twitter and facebook peeps in hopes that someone will have some good advice for you.

      reply
      • pam

        awww,,,thank you so much,,,I have nobody to help me out and need all the advice i can get,,,im so grateful

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      • Kathy Parker

        My husband and I own a Roadtrek 190 Popular. It’s a 2000 and we bought it new. I had researched out the purchase for months before we actually bought. I settled on this van because of the holding tanks. ( We do a lot of boondocking ) BUT we hate the beds, the twins are too narrow and made up into anything bigger is a daily chore and a real pain. The newer models have an electric sofa design that is really much better. I also prefer an enclosed bath, even if it’s wet. Much more private. We have looked at other manufactures and today I’d buy a Leisure Van or even a Pleasure way. If you’re buying used, the older Great West vans have some unique layouts and have the best insulation packages. They all get between 15 and 18 MPG. I think looking for one with low mileage is key. Also have someone check underneath for rust on the tanks, especially the propane tanks. Also watch out for the propane lines, mice love them. All in all though, I love our van and now that we’re getting ready to move into something else, it makes me sad that I need to buy something larger. I love the gas mileage… and the ability to park it almost everywhere. Also please check out the “wide bodies”.. if you’re going to live in it, a little more space might be appreciated.

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        • pam

          kathy, thank you very so much ! I am now looking at those 210 populars wide body in a chevy with 50,000 miles or less,, I have seen them going for around 22,500 in a later year like 1999 or a 2002 year on the rv trader,,,but they go as soon as they post them,,,good luck with your next purchase and thanks again for the great info.

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        • Judi

          Kathy, I went form a Roadtrek to a Leisure Travel Free Spirit SS – be sure to look at the one that is SS. It still has the great mileage and size, but it has a small slide out that makes so much difference. It also has a separate shower and lots (really!) of storage. I love it!

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          • thanks for sharing your personal experience Judi! glad to hear you are loving your SS!

    • Marty

      Hi, I have a roadtrek on a Dodge chasis. It has been more than reliable for going on 27 years with more to go. I have no complaints at all. Chev also make a very reliable vehicle as well. I don’t think you could go wrong with either one.

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      • pam

        hi marty i guess what i am really wanting to know is which one has most durable motor , transmission , and rearend also the best insulation. thanks and hope to hear from you or somebody on this . thanks again pam

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    • Kathy Card

      Pam, I’m in the same boat. What have you figured out?
      Kathy , age 60 ib Florida

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  • My husband and I own a small business also traveling 9 months out of the year, putting around 50,000 miles on a vehicle per year. We love the input you’ve given on the small RV’s and went and looked at these specific RVs yesterday without even looking at your suggestion page. The problem we are running into is the price point. We want a fuel efficient vehicle that drives nicely, because we will be in the RV a lot and one that has enough room to live. But after 3-4 years of traveling we will have put around 180K to 200K on the vehicle and are needing to finance most of the vehicle. We don’t want to be upside down on the payments after the first year. We were told it would be best for us to trade in after two years. We were also shown a Ford Coachman 19CB and a 21QB. Not sure how we feel about Ford and placing that many miles on one. Thoughts? Love the website and will definately be checking back in to see anymore suggestions you may have!

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  • Karen

    $100K up for a first RV? That means if she decides to change to another or larger model she will take a huge hit on depreciation.
    Find a smallish Class C for under $20K , use it a year and decide what you really want.
    I had a used top of the line Class B for 4 winters and sold it for exactly what I had in it. I now have a used “luxury” Class C that cost well under $20K. The savings buys me a lot of fuel. Also buying used is more “green” than buying new as the carbon footprint has already been used. To spend $50K more to get 2 MPG higher is not good math.

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  • Debi

    Try the Leisure Travel Vans 2013 or 2014 Free Spirit SS. It has a three piece “dry” bath( ie a separate shower!), LOTS of storage, a wonderful sliding screen door, a “full sized” convertable sofa bed….and drives almost like a car! This one is a winner for someone traveling alone. PLUS it gets about 18 miles to the gallon!

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    • Judi

      I love my SS!

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  • My wife and i’ve had several types of RVs, each had their pros/cons (starting with a 1980 WESTY). Our current rig we jokingly introduce as out 34ft articulated motorhome 🙂
    Our “Bed” tow vehicle is a 2010 Chevy 1500 AWD van convertion. It tows a 15ft fiberglass trailer, our “Breakfast”. The van is a near perfect rolling inSuite master bedroom, and the trailer is a wonderful _greatroom_, with dinette, galley, bath/shower. This combination allows for two totally separate areas which can be nice at times. We take the rig off road on many of the forestry roads to primitive campgrounds, and boondock exclusively except for one annual event with fellow enthusiast.

    In the end, i think the best RV is the one that is taken and used, rather than sitting in a driveway…we go out about each 4th week on week long adventures and typically will see ~70+ nights a year in our rig(s).

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  • Erica

    Very helpful.Thank you!

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  • duey

    A word about Class B we have a Roadtrek 190 ad the ride on some freeways and secondary roads can be very rough, we have had all sorts of work done on it to no effect. Very unhappy

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  • Hi! Would you mind if I share your weblog with my facebook group? There’s a lot of folks that I believe would truly enjoy your content. Please let me know. Cheers

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  • I’m still looking for something about the size of the old VW Westfalia’s. Sprinters are too big.

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  • Gaius Gracchus

    Not sure when the motorhome manufacturers are going to get a clue that younger people with $$$$ are out there and prefer a more tastefully designed interior.

    I swear some of the color schemes must have been concocted by someone on crack. Not just ugly, but bizarre, too.

    There are a few class A’s out there with contemporary styling: Winnebago/Itasca Via/Reyo and the Thor Serrano.

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    • Amen! We have been preaching this, just not sure how many manufactures are listening to us. 🙂

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  • We’ve been looking at the Sprinter options also.
    Leisure travel seems to have some great options coming out this year and Advanced RV is a new Sprinter Conversion co. out of Ohio.
    They offer a Diesel heater…not sure about a Diesel cooktop but that would be nice…no propane. We drove our 40ft. Diesel Pusher out to Flagstaff, AZ from Chicago just to see all the 4X4 options for Overlanding and dry camping. Very interesting and intriquing!
    Rande

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  • Wow… check out the Free Spirit SS. This looks like it could be a GREAT RV for trips lasting a few weeks.

    http://www.leisurevans.com/freespirit-ss/index.html

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  • We get 15.5 mpg on average. That’s after logging and tracking every fill-up since we started. 17,000 miles. I took a photo of the gauge after coasting down out of Yosemite using the engine brake because it said 55 mpg 🙂

    I highly reccommend taking a look at the Via/Reyo. The 2012/13 models were really improved with all of the modifications I wish we had :/

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  • We pondered these same questions before buying our Itasca Reyo. It is only 25′ long and 8′ wide which is not a whole lot larger than a well appointed class B but it provides a LOT more livability. It’s built on a Sprinter chassis so it gets great mileage.

    The View photo you’ve got doesn’t match the floor plan. That’s a View Profile photo that doesn’t have the loft bed.

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  • mary van

    Great information! I love that you guys have done all the research. Just need to hit a show to see which one really fits me best. Thanks!

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  • I have the 2012 Winnebago ERA Class B which is similar to the Airstream you mention above. Mine has the electric sofa at back which folds down to a queen/double bed at night. Love the gas mileage … 18-22 MPG. Love the fact that I can drive or park just about anywhere. PLUS … I don’t have to tow a car behind which is a nuisance for a traveller. (I am not a camper … I travel, not camp). Something you can’t do with the larger Class A. And as any Canadian will tell you … I love the fact that I can even drive through the Tim Horton’s drive-thru. Bonus!!!

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  • Great comments, One thing to keep in mind on gas vs diesel is sometimes finding a diesel mechanic is hard to do, but with the ford triton v-10 you can almost find someone in every town that can work on it and it is a tried and true engine. The Itasca 30″ is what we have and use it for the same reasons that Mary does and its perfect for us.
    Thanks Rob

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  • We just went with a Evergreen Everlite Travel Trailer – it’s the most environmentally friendly trailer made, and we went with the 27RB because of the slide out and the storage, we didn’t need lots of sleeping space so this is great with a queen bed and still room to sleep 4 more on fold outs. We chose travel trailer so we could un-hitch from the Chevy Avalanche we already own, and go antiquing whenever we wanted, without having to buy smaller vehicle to tow behind (that wouldn’t hold very many big antique finds either!) It was super affordable option, we found a spotless one year old one for under 20K!!!
    http://www.goevergreenrv.com/products/111/Ever-Lite—Ever-Lite-Select

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  • Phil

    Great synopsis, Nikki and Jason. When we had our old VW Westfalia, I always appreciated having the pop-up bed in the roof seperate from the living area. It would seem that these class B’s have a thing or two to learn from the simplicity of the old VW. Do you have any recommendation of an economical (ie Sprinter chassis) Class C’s or B’s that have either a popup bed in the roof or a bed over the driver like the old class C’s used to.
    Cheers,
    Phil

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  • Great post with a nice variety of Sprinters! I’ve been working and playing from my Winnebago View for the past 3 years. It’s a very comfy home-on-the-road for one or two people. If Mary is not sure about investing that much money into an RV, if she has an SUV that is capable of towing, there are some fun small trailers that are outside the “boring square white box” norm– I owned a teardrop-shaped [email protected] trailer before moving up to my View, and if I would have continued towing, would have gone with an Airstream or a Casita. These small trailers cost anywhere from $8 to $60K depending if you go new or used. Check out my blog page, A Girl’s Guide to RVing, for my thoughts comparing these two types of RVs (and other fun RVing topics stuff such as how to dump your tanks or hook up a toad!):
    http://winnieviews.blogspot.com/p/girls-guide-to-rving.html

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