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sunset at anchor

Sailboat Life – Finding Our Groove and Getting Burned

We’re only in the first paragraph of the first chapter of our sailing life.  This is the wee beginnings of what could turn out to be several epic novels worth of life, adventure and adversity.  It’s exciting…so exciting that I feel like everyone is trying to catapult us to chapter 12.

“Where are you going first?  Are you planning to circumnavigate the globe?  Are you going to get your captains license?  What are you going to do about pirates?  What’s your hurricane plan?  Why haven’t you posted a new video?  Are you going to scrape those barnacles off of your hull?”

Whoa nelly!  At this point we’re still trying to learn where we can safely park our dingy so we can go to the supermarket.

That’s where we are now, getting in the groove of full-time life aboard our sailboat.  Learning to survive, thrive and laugh at our mistakes along the way.  Sure there’s a million and one questions (and concerns) going through our heads, but we’re trying to take it one day at a time.

Yep, newbies indeed!  I feel the burn in my fingers, and my pride, every time I watch this video.  Ouch!  I have a feeling I will never do that again (or so I hope).

We’ve been going at warp speed for weeks on end and we’re still not at the point where we can see the light at the end of the tunnel.   So much to learn, so much to do and soooo much money flying out the door to make this dream a reality.  It’s overwhelming at times but we know it’s all part of the process.  Every full or part time live aboard sailor I’ve talked with has gone through a similar process.  They all say it’s hard work now, a little less work later and 100% worth it.  Our time here at Lake Sylvia was a tiny glimpse of the joys and adventures that lie ahead.

sailboat life

life on a sailboat

Finding Balance

It was nice to have a have a few days at anchor, away from the marina to simply live.  Each day we set the timer for an hour and forced ourselves to do something fun.  Paddle around on the iSUP, sit outside and read a book in the sun or hop in the water and go for a swim.  We also made sundowners (boat talk for cocktails at sunset) part of our daily routine.  It was a lovely balance of work and play.

Curiosity the catamaran

sundowners on s/v curiosity

sailboat life

Cats On Board

Oh, and then there’s the cats.  The cats are ridiculously happy at anchor.  On land it’s all about chasing the squirrels, lizards and insects.  On water it’s plotting how to snatch the fish as they swim by, playing with lines that dance in the wind and who can score the best sunbathing spot in the cockpit.

cats on a sailboat

cats on a sailboat

cats on a catamaran

We’re itching to throw off the bowlines and sail away from this safe harbor but we’re not there yet.  Eventually we’ll have the answers to all those burning, long term questions that keep rolling in because we’re excited to see what happens in chapter 12 of our life at sea too.  But for now, we’re going to take it one page, lost fish, rope burn and happy hour at a time.

Apps, Gear and Deets From The Video

  • Anchorage Lake Sylvia is just off the ICW in Fort Lauderdale past the 17th St. Causeway bridge.  It’s is a free anchorage and there seems to be no limit to how long you can stay at this time.  There were a couple of boats that had been there over a year (however, it doesn’t sound like long term stays are encouraged or appreciated by the homeowners and locals). We were anchored there for four days.
  • Apps & Websites – For this stay we used tides near me to keep track of tides, Active Captain to find dingy parking and local information and Drag Queen as our anchor alarm to make sure we weren’t dragging to help keep us sleeping sound.  All of these are free.
  • Waterproof Handbag & Cell Phone Case – I found this Ugo bag at the boat show and I have not stopped using it since.  I don’t have to worry about sand, water, rain or anything else.  If I drop it in the water, it floats and I can pick it right up. You can find it (and a discount code) through our gear store here: Ugo Waterproof Pack
  • Insulated Grocery Tote Bag –  Our little red and white tote bag is near the end of its life and has had a good run.  We love having our insulated tote bags for grocery runs or a day at the beach or park.  I just ordered this slick looking insulated tote bag as our new replacement: Arctic Zone Thermal Tote
  • Cooler Pack –  Nu Ice packs are awesome for keeping things cool for hours on end.  We use them in place of ice to keep things cold on grocery runs.
  • Bar Tools – I have had my multi tool for making cocktails for a couple of years now and it’s like the swiss army for bartenders.  You may have also noticed my dapper looking penguin cocktail shaker, and my short and stocky martini glasses.  I am a sucker for fun drink-ware.
  • Cocktail Mixer – We love our cocktails!  The mixer I used in the video is called Owls’ Brew Pink and Black.  Its a mix of black tea, hibiscus, lemon peel, and splashed with strawberry and lemon juices.  Check it out here: http://amzn.to/28Ymu1O
  • Coffee Set up –  We’ve had our chandelier coffee pot and cups for over 10 years but the Melitta porcelain pour over is newer.  We liked this one because it holds a #4 filter and can make up to 6-8 cups at one time.
  • Happy Hour – Market 17 has half off appetizers and drinks each weekday from 4:30 – 7pm.
  • Dingy Parking – Southport Raw Bar allows dingy parking for $10 which is good towards food and beverage within the same day.
  • Camera For Filming –  We mostly used our A6000 and RX100 which you can learn more about here: Our Top Camera Gear for Travel Videos & Photography
  • Kent – He’s one of the owners of Just Catamarans which specializes in service and sales of (you guessed it) catamarans.  He’s our broker (the guy that sold us our sailboat) and his team is doing our service work (solar, composting toilet install, maintenance…).  Through the process of buying the boat and having work done, he has become a friend and a sailing mentor (which is why you keep seeing him in our videos).

Have any lifestyle tips to share for a couple of newbie liveaboards?  Maybe you’re dying to share your favorite big-fish-catchin’ rod and reel (obviously we need a bigger set up)?  Keep the conversation going in the comments below, we’re always down for tips.  If you’re in the market for a nice dinghy, let us know.  This center console is way too heavy for our boat so it’s gotta go in the near future…and it’s not just because it burned my fingers! 🙂

Hello there! I honestly don’t know what to say, so I am going to tell you a bunch of random facts instead. I'm a fish eating vegetarian who hates spiders and loves snakes. I almost never took vacations growing up. I wanted to be Pippi Longstocking (still do). I misspell about every other word I write and still struggle with grammar. I love splurging on a good high tea (which is really hard to find these days). And whatever you do, don’t tell me I can’t do something, because then I'll HAVE to do it!

Comments (109)

  • Bill Wallace

    I am a retired old coot and a widower so I have nothing but time to watch YT. I’ve been following you from just before you bought the boat…then I went back and watched the RV videos… I must say your videos are getting better and better with every Vlog, (I do have a radio and TV background). Almost everything about your show has matured immensely…and then there is Jason’s hair. I sailed my own little lake-locked, dagger-board sail boat back in the dark ages and I appreciate the chance to share that same magic through your fresh experiences. All The Best to you both.

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    • Thank you so much for taking the time to write, it means a lot to hear such wonderful comments like these during a week when it seems everything is working against our leaving the dock.

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  • Michael Balka

    Laughed when I watched the dingy go down…and it does happen to everyone sooner or later. I got conked on the head with the mainsail boom on one of my training voyages. And I was pi$$ed off that I did it, too.
    Keep trying, keep learning, and keep your heads high. Great job! Love the vlog, looking forward to the rest of the story!

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  • Dreaming O'Sailing

    Stumbled across your sailing Vlogs from the comments in another sailing channel..and binge watched this rainy weekend. Thank you *so much* for sharing your stories. Hope to hit the seas as a sailing family 3-4 years out and trying to learn as much as possible. Thanks for sharing the good, the bad, and the ugly. Particularly like the bits about changing oil filters and engine maintenance as the only oil change I’ve done is on a lawun mower 🙂 So many systems to learn and troubleshoot on a boat and I love how you’ve both dove in…and not afraid to show the mistakes… and the whole process of finding a sailboat, buying it and moving to a livaboard lifestyle. Please keep going with this and ignore the haters. You both are an inspiration, inspiring and educating future travellers. Hope to see you out there one day to share a cocktail.

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  • Greg

    You don’t have to post; just wondering the brand of stadium seats you have. Thought they’d be a great stow on our west wight potter. Thanks

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  • Charlotte

    Love that you have made the lifestyle progression to sailing. We did just the opposite, lived & traveled on a 36′ sailboat for 14 yr., now live & travel in our 40’class A going to places we couldn’t get the sailboat. I am enjoying reliving our experience through yours. We spent time in Lake Sylvia, the Raw Bar has awesome Clam Chowder for your $10.00 dingy fee. Blue Water Books in the same shopping center as Publix is great resource for info, charts, books, etc. Try not to get discouraged by the hugh learning curve. Even with years of sailing experience, living aboard & traveling on the water is a constant learning experience! It was the hardest, most rewarding, best part of my 67yr. of live. We’re now loving the rv life, but there is nothing like enjoying that early morning coffee or evening cocktail in the cockpit on the hook somewhere. I look forward to following your adventures on the water!

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  • Hi guys! We were ISUPIng right there a few weeks ago 🙂 We travel full time but stay in hotels and are just deciding to research RV’s – look like we came across you guys just a little too late. Ah well, there’s always the archives ha! Keep on keeping on!

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  • Terry

    Hi Jason and Nikki! Happy ID4! Have you guys heard of this rust-resistance folding electric bike made for boat owners? If you think it might come in handy, check it out here https://goo.gl/Rls5bW. A new campaign just launched on Indiegogo yesterday. Enjoy!

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  • Ronnie Pryor

    Ft Lauderdale local here….. Make sure to check out coconuts for half priced wine night! Monday and Tuesday. They have free dockage and are close to the lake you’re anchored in.

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  • My Ugo pack arrived today and I plan on testing it out while SUPing on the ocean this weekend! Thank you for the recommendation and discount!

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  • Ann

    Question: I’m curious about your cat litter plans. A comparatively minor concern, I know, but am just wondering what you use and how you’ll stock enough to last for lengthier trips.

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  • Mark

    Hi Niki & Jason,
    Firstly let me congratulate you on your purchase. let me also say that the 2 types of travel are very similar, its about system management and baby steps. i owned a converted camper for many years, off bike riding and camping in Lake Garda, and then skiing in the winter. it just take a bit of forward planning. if you have the time, which you seem to, then its easy.
    I now own a Janneau sailboat, (Monohull) this was undoubtedly a fantastic swap from the driving, as i can now and i do sail everywhere and anywhere( within reason,) i not as lucky as Jason to have a partner who wishes to do the same, but who know its a big world.
    now for some advise, only use official sites like RYA or USCG, for advice, and courses the reason for this, they have done the research for you and large organisation cant be that wrong.
    WIFI in fairly available anywhere now, it not as bad a some would say.
    All the kit you buy with consider the element your in, Helly Henson famous words are there is no such thing as bad weather it is bad clothing. as a tip, if you buy any clothing or kit, for a boat, it comes with $$$$$$, however if you but stuff from canoe websites and cycling sites it is half the amount. i sailing in a pair of cycling trousers totally waterproof. and they cost £20.0
    learn to navigate using charts first and foremost, then use the IPAD for quick looks, ( https://webapp.navionics.com)
    As you can tell i live in the UK, and we have to consider tides as well as weather, in the west cost of US, i am not sure its so important.
    Anchor when ever you can, as it is totally free, Marina will charge you. you own a cat so it will be 50% more. i went sailing last week to the Scillie isle, my total costs for the week was £45.0. you cant get a BB for that, see link ( https://www.visitislesofscilly.com/)
    I wish you luck and fair seas, i will keep watching…..!

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  • William doering

    I just watched your last video.. Nikki, sorry about the hand.
    Jason, I was watching you pour gas into the dingy. May I suggest….You need a siphon hose. It is a five foot clear hose with a copper fitting and a glass ball inside. You can get them at NAPA or online and it will make filling that dingy a breeze. They are very low tech… But effective. I use it for my jet ski and boat.

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  • I think you might want to consider selling (renting) your guest room for a few $$$$ to help with the costs… Since I suggested it I get first go for a discount !! 🙂

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  • John S.

    Nikki – I felt the burn as soon as I saw you snap your hand away. OUCH.

    Please be careful so that you don’t grip a line near a winch and get your hand trapped by the winch as the line slowly pulls the skin off. Thats a BIG ouch. In other words, learn from the mistakes of others as you’ll never have enough time to learn them all yourself.

    Love the new photo in your replies.

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  • Ronnie Rhyne

    I didn’t know till a few years ago Nikki to put ice on a burn just as soon as you burn yourself. It works too, it takes a lot of the pain away then polysporin after. The best to both of you…you both are so BRAVE !!!

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  • Bruno

    Professional video as always guys. I have seen many video-blogs, yours is of profeswsional quality. Congrats to the editor.
    I agree with other posters, the drag on that fishing rod is too tights. Set it a bit looser and tighten a bit at a time until it feels right. The idela way of setting ti is with a fish scale at 85% of breaking strangth of the fishing line. For the kind of fish you are trying to catch, you should have 16-20 lbs line. Also, once the fish takes line, just keep the rod tip as vertical as possible without reeling the line in.
    I feel I should not say this…but here it goes. I would not have purchased an old Leopard. The new front porch feature of the new leopard is amazing and provides with more room, flexibility and fun. There should be a 2012 L44 by you which is fully equipped…

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  • William (Bill) Weaver

    Your switching from RV to the water got me thinking again about cruising. Several years ago I purchased the charts, guides, a boat, etc to cruise the ICW. Family medical problems got in the way, so I sold the boat. I love Alaska as do you and have been watching lots of YouTubes on cruising the Inside Passage. Looks like a great ride (hint, hint). One of the videos noted that their v-hull tender (like yours) was unable to get to shore on some landings. They purchased a smaller one with a flat bottom to solve the problem. Something to think about when you look for another tender. Keep learning and living the life.

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  • Rosemary

    I have followed y’all for awhile now. I enjoy seeing your adventures ! Sorry you hurt yourself!

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  • Jonathan D

    Hey guys, If you are in the mood for a veg only meal and haven’t tried it already, we really liked Green Bar Kitchen when we were in Ft Lauderdale in December. Highly recommend if you end up in their neighborhood. Should be relatively close to the water.

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  • Anna Futrell

    My best tip for that burn on your hand is aloe gel in a bottle and keep it in your fridge. It also works great on sun burns. I recently did it with a horse rope, helping to load horses but also needed a tetanus shot. On my boat I only had an ice chest, nothing feels as good on burns as cold aloe and big band aids to block the air.
    Love your videos can’t wait to get back to the ocean myself.

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  • Don Thompson

    I’m almost 70 years old. I expect to make stupid mistakes and not so stupid mistakes every year. I haven’t missed a year in as long as I can remember. But, I don’t remember, as I forget about them. To err is human, to be human is divine. Enjoy your divinity. I love your blog.

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  • Andrew

    You guys will figure this out! Good Luck with the sailing lessons. It will be indispensable knowledge!

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  • C. Wilson M.D.

    You should add a bottle of ammonia to your first aid kit to treat jellyfish stings. Also recommend you buy some “advanced healing” bandaids in different sizes, much better than the other types and especially good for blisters.

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  • Brock

    Do not swim in that green cloudy water. It’s an algae boom from the lake Okeechobee run off. amoeba in it can enter ear and or nasal passage get to your brain and kill you.

    No joke.

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  • Brian P.Johnson

    Omg!Southport raw bar,my hangout back in the 70’s when it’s was Ted Twists. Keep plugging, you guy’s are doing great!

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  • Sorry about the rope burn. I find that vaseline helps on burns to stop the pain right away, but you have to keep applying it every few seconds at first and then after a few applications the pain stops for longer periods of time until it finally stops.
    I love the picture of the cats on their new “bed”. Leave it to a cat to find someplace like that! I worry about those guys falling overboard when they get the crazies.
    I’m sure it is very stressful with all the work and things you have to learn in your transition to sailors but once you get past this initial stage, I’m sure it will be worth it. We used to go on live aboard dive boats to the Bahamas, and it was wonderful to actually live on the boat. We dove all day, partied at night and slept under the stars. Once you get past all the hard stuff, you’ll be at anchored in some beautiful remote cove in the Bahamas with crystal clear blue water and loads of fish for the taking. Keep your eye on the prize.

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  • Doug Miller

    You might be interested to know that Florida is working on some legislation to limit free anchorages. There are some areas where folks are using derelict boats as homes, and the areas are starting to become an eyesore resembling a hobo camp. Needless to say, people who have purchased expensive waterfront homes aren’t thrilled to see a hobo camp spring up in their “back yard”. The same issue has been occurring in other areas, such as San Francisco as well. They are trying to figure out how to fix the hobo camp problem without eliminating the anchorages. Maybe issuing permits for limited periods of time or something.

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  • Ron

    Gotta loosen the drag on your fishing reel. From the video it looked like you had it cranked as tight as it would go. You loosen the drag so when the fish makes a run it can pull line off the reel instead of breaking the line. This is especially important when you have the fish close to the boat. (Smaller fish is not so important as the strength of the line can handle the run. Big fish, like you had on, it is very important to have the drag set correctly) Don’t fret you will have many more opportunities to get fish in the boat.

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  • Mary

    I’ve got arnica and some citronella oil I will bring. I can’t wait to see you and the boat!

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  • Christopher E.

    Sorry about your hand. Got a little zing like that once from a fishing line with a shark on the other end. Sorry about your fish, too. Tell Jason to be quicker with the “net”. You might need a gaff for fish that size. Consider a minnow trap or some frozen bait instead of losing $$ on artificial lures.

    I also like Tides Near Me. Simple. User-friendly. Responsive.

    Your cat pix make me want to take to the sea right now and not wait until retirement. Please keep us informed of tips you learn for keeping them safe. I want to take the cats along someday, but I’m terrified of losing one overboard. And keep posting cat pix.

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  • I was going to ask what kind of dinghy you have, but I see you are looking to get another in the near future. Couple of questions. Why is the center console too heavy? What is it doing to the dinghy (obviously maybe because of weight) just wanting to get as much info on that. What type of or size dinghy or you looking to get? I absolutely love your blog! My fiancé and I are looking for our new home on a boat as we speak and I read your blog religiously as a newbie guide!! Hope to meet you guys one day on the water! You guys rock! Maybe we can share some sundowners together!! Thanks!!

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  • I loved seeing you reading the basic keelboat book from ASA at the end of the video. My husband and I just finished ASA101 a couple weeks ago and the two of us spent time just like you guys, reading our copies side by side (we too bought a boat before taking the class, people thought we were crazy but it works for us!). All the best to you in your adventures, hope your hand heals quickly Nikki!

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  • Phil

    Dinghy is an inflatable or other small sailer. Dingy is grub and dirty. Cheers!

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  • Amanda

    Nikki, off topic and I hope you don’t mind me saying…your skin is beautiful. Do you care to share what sunscreen you use and make up?
    Thanks and we just love reading and watching you guys!

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  • Kelvin Ritchie

    When you are at anchorage is the sailboat like your RV in that everything runs off batteries? Can you run the A/C for the cats when you leave on excursions? Do you sleep without A/C in Florida?

    Thanks

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  • Sandy Gens

    Hey Nikki – Like my grandpa used to say, “If that’s the worst thing that happens to you for the whole rest of your life, you’re going to be doing just fine.” And I love your kitties – such attitude!

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  • Steve Schafer

    Hi Wynners!
    Couple items to make life better for ya. Arnica Gel for any injury use liberally immediately repeatedly. Looks like Aloe Vera has a lil bit of alcohol as a preservative will help you to heal quickly and often without scarring when otherwise you wouldn’t. This stuff is a miracle, really, after you’ve been using it for a while you’ll realize what a lifesaver it is. Even more so on a boat.

    Next is Rescue Remedy spray, a Bach Flower Remedy. This takes the emotional sting out of any trauma. The quicker you recover emotionally the sooner you start making better decisions based on rational clear (think return to happy) thinking. This is just important everywhere all the time. Also useful when trauma is just an lil emotional disappointment, will brighten your spirit, Also the pastilles are amazing too (and addictive). If I were in your neighborhood I would have gifted you these things but since I’m in SoCal I gift you with the knowledge. Available at heath food stores like Whole Foods. May you be happy and in love. Aloha Steve

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  • Gregg Schulz

    Sorry for your injury Nikki. Glad it won’t be too terrible. As terrible as it is and feels, I think every boater has done that once or twice. I guess it is a right of passage. You are now truly a boater now. I’ve done that during my time as a boater. As for fueling the boat, look for a long filtered funnel like you would use to fill a portable generator. Something with a large top openning and a bottom that will fit fully into the fuel tank filler openning. It will raise your filling point somewhat and make it easier to pour

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  • Randy Johnson

    Checklists for all important systems. Easy to type up, take to Office Depot, and cover with plastic. Punch a hole and hang/tie/place them near the system, if possible.
    http://www.artofmanliness.com/2014/12/08/the-power-of-checklists/

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  • Eric Connelly

    Something that might help you find places you are looking for in the dinghy is a mobile navigation app. I prefer Garmin BlueChart as it supports the Active Captain overlay and uses a one-time fee (around $30) vs. an annual subscription. Since you download the blocks of charts you want, it doesn’t require internet to use it while underway–just the GPS chip in your smartphone or tablet. It also serves as a good backup for your primary unit on the catamaran in the event your electronics’ battery fails (has happened to me on the ICW) and makes a nice resource for future trip planning & calculations. Other info included in the app are tides, currents, and a weather overlay.

    All the best in your adventure–my wife and I are doing the opposite–boat to RV and your site has been very educational to us.

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  • Jobeth

    I know this is a silly question, but what kind of cocktail did you make in the video? Thanks and you guys enjoy the journey!

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  • Rodney Briley

    OUCH !!!
    After raising the dingy up on the boat, wrap the line around the winch, then stow your line.

    Any accidental release will not allow the dingy to go down fast.

    Dangerous to not do this procedure.

    I feel your pain, ouch ouch ouch
    There are a lot of dangerous habits sailing that will eventually bit you. The key is to identify EVERY dangerous habit before it bites.

    Love your videos
    Rodney

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  • Hal and Lois Lucas

    We just watched the video this morning. We love how you can show what it’s really like on your adventure. We feel like we are there with you. Thanks for that. Sorry about the rope burn.

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  • Bernard

    For the rope burn or any burn for that matter: have un-scent aloe vera around! It cools and helps with the pain.

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  • Lucille

    I enjoyed your day with the video. Sorry about your rope burn. You are both very courageous and much braver than I am. Thanks for sharing.

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  • So happy to see the cats enjoying themselves so much and getting their little sea legs. I used to sail Hobie Cats and thought that was a lot of work but, wow, it’s a good thing you two are young and energetic! You are busy!

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  • Lucille

    The kitties are so adorable. Would they dare to jump off of the boat to catch a fish and then hope that you can
    get them back on the boat with the fish in their mouth. I thought that cats did not like the water and that you would not have to worry about one of them jumping in. They sure do know how to relax and enjoy it all. They are a lot of fun entertainment for you so you have your own built in entertainment on board.

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  • Lucille

    I enjoy reading about your adventures and missed hearing from you, but I can see how really busy and tired that you can be and just do not have the time. Sounds busy and exhausting to me. A lot of fun but with a lot of hard work, too. Thanks for sharing with us landlubbers, and especially me, who has yet to be on a large cruise ship even. Good luck and much fun and happiness wishes are bestowed on you by me.

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  • Marcia Jones Goynes

    I’m so enjoying your adventures around the canals of Fort Liquordale! I used to have a condo right on the New River off of Las Olas, did my grocery shopping at the Publix where you were. So much fun to see!!! You are doing great! Sorry about the rope burn!!! Ouch!

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  • Having grown up in Ft. Liquordale, at least, that’s what we called it back in the ’50’s and ’60’s, it was a quaint little town. Now, you couldn’t pay me enough money to live there again. In saying all of that, I want to start off with wishing you both success in your new adventure. Personally, having owned a diesel pusher and a boat, I would take the coach any day. I liken the owning of the boat to restoring a historic mansion; bottom less money pit! Not trying to be negative, just the facts! And, as you are finding out, anything around Bahia Mar is pricey!
    I am, however, looking forward to your sailing classes and sincerely wish you both great success. I have enjoyed following your travels in both the motorhome and now the cat.

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  • The rewards have to be coming..I am sure the change is exhausting but your video blog is so entertaining and like someone already mentioned like reading a book that you can’t put down. The unexplored places, and when you do start catching your dinner and the fabulous sunsets from around the world are coming..can’t wait. In the meantime I am coming to FLL to my brother’s house and would you like to meet up and have another author buy you dinner or drinks?

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  • Ouch! I felt that, poor you hope it is feeling better. It is slot of hard work on a sailing boat. Be careful out there xxx. Love watching your videos xx

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  • Nancy Fernandez

    Wow Nikki I felt that burn from here. I Loved it, you didn’t hesitate to say how it felt “Like a SOB” 🙂 yet you braved through it and still went shopping but the drink helped. Wasn’t sure how or if I was going to enjoy you guys on water as much as I Loved following you in the RV but I think it would be a blast to follow you two any where. You lift my spirits just watching and reading the good and the not so good and the how not too’s. lol
    Enjoying the ride thx for sharing it with us.

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  • Margo Doll

    Hubby and I have been following you for years in your RV journey, and as I’ve mentioned before, you inspired us to get our RV about 3 years ago and we are so incredibly glad we did! It’s been a blast! So I guess this means we may be sailing into the sunset one day, too!! ? Love the new videos ♡

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  • Angela Gill

    Awesome video. And Nikki I flinched when I seen you jump and wow you actually handled the burn better that most I know. You two and your videos make me feel like I am there and part of your lives. Thank you for sharing and can’t wait to see more.

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  • Bill

    Drag setting on the reel. You have to learn to adjust or there will be many more lost fish. Adjust then pull it out by hand to test. If a large fish pulls and no line comes off, you can adjust while playing the fish but not recommended. Fishing takes quite a while to get competent. Have been watching videos reading your blog for a while. looking forward to the next chapters.

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  • Kevin Baker

    I noticed that while shopping you were thinking of getting “iodine”. Do NOT use it on any cut that possibly came from coral. The bad little thingies in coral thrive on iodine and will leave a nasty infection, or blood poisoning. I love your show, only wish your boat were a monohull.

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  • Elmo Harris

    My only comment is that I can’t read your article because that social media bar on the left makes your article unreadable on a smartphone. Please move that thing out of the way!

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    • Elmo Harris

      Great video, by the way!

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    • Don Thompson

      Ditto, I hate that bar.

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  • Sandra & the 2 Spaniels

    All I can say, is that the cats have come into their own! Not only did the kitties “embrace” the whole sailing thing; they seem to have fallen in love with sailing. I think that they liked the RV life, but sailing is simply The Cats’ Meow!! 😉

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  • We are still on the rving side of our adventure and love watching you guys continue to push the boundaries of adventure. It’s both continued encouragement for us and thought provoking as to what our next adventure should be. Everyone thought we were crazy 2 and half years ago when I stopped flying every week for my job (missing precious time with my young kids and beautiful wife) and bought an RV so we could travel together making lemons out of lemonade with an intense travel job. I always tell everyone that there are still lows on the road in 400 square feet as we travel the country with 3 small kids but the highs are like nothing I can explain. We can’t imagine going back to a sedendary life.
    Regarding the rope burns, I always tell my kids if you’re not getting hurt, your not playing hard enough ?
    Keep inspiring the rest of us out here.

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  • Julia

    Great blog post and video! Thank you for sharing you’d experiences! I hope your hand heals fast Nikki ? that burn looked painful Nikki ?I totally love you boat ! ?

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  • illya

    awesome guys 🙂 Thanks for the sharing.
    here’s a couple tips for you that may be useful.
    I have this pump and love it, just make sure to tighten it to the can enough so it doesn’t leak
    https://www.amazon.com/TERAPUMP-Generation-Non-spill-Auto-Stop-attachment/dp/B00M1WBRKM/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1466998998&sr=8-1&keywords=terapump+2nd+generation+trfa01

    hydrogen peroxide isn’t a very good antiseptic
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vVSC79nxCvI

    Thanks again so much for sharing your lives with us all
    illya

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      • illya

        you are tough as hell, i would have been crying i think. When i saw your reaction i figured maybe just a little redness LOL that rope ripped your skin right off!! You are going to make an awesome sailor. I feel sorry for Jason if he ever gets a smack from that hand. LOL

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  • Nikki, on FISHING:

    There’s a “drag” setting on every reel, which determines when the line starts to slip out even if the reel is locked. You need to set this drag below the breaking strength of your line. That way, when a big fish pulls hard, the reel will give instead of the line breaking. Also, get used to the technique of pulling the rod, then relaxing the pull while you reel in line. Makes winding that reel a lot easier.

    I really like your collective attitude about your ambitious life-style change. Your wisdom exceeds your years, and you should be commended. Keep it up, be safe, have fun.

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  • Rhonda

    I just love your adventures and zest for life and travel. I began following while you were RVing and am equally enthralled in your new lifestyle. This video was particularly interesting in your finding a parking space; land or sea, just the same :). I eagerly await the next video!
    Thank you so much for sharing.

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  • Denny Kent

    It sounds like the ‘drag” on your real is set too hard/tight. Your line should have been going out at least 25% of the time as you were reeling the fish in…
    Just a friendly FYI.
    Long time follower & love your blog–

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  • Sheila Hagadone

    Poor, poor Nikki!!! O U C H!!!!! Bet you don’t do THAT again….(hard way to learn)
    Jason, I noticed a huge scare on your head….mind me asking, what happened?
    Hope there is no more serious injuries onboard (or off).
    Looks awfully comfy in bed (except for the books!)!
    Can’t wait till your next video!
    Your friend you’ve never met, Sheila

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      • Sheila Hagadone

        Whew, thank goodness!!!
        Hope your hand is on its way to healing!
        Remember, Vit E oil is excellent to keep from scaring.
        Living the good life!!!!
        Your friend you’ve never met, Sheila

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  • Susan Steffani

    Wow. Ya’ll are the epitome of the saying, “any inconvenience properly looked at is an adventure”. Kudos to your journey. I, however, prefer land and as such will remain an avid rv’r. Makes me wonder how you get drinking water and ice. You need a couple of dwarf tomato and lemon plants – a grow system and herbs. Jason, you could make your own craft beer aboard – name it the dinghy cats draft! Lol. Stay safe and thanks for sharing.

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  • I simply love the way you guys videoblog. It is a great glimpse of another life that I’d love to try out. Seriously, Nikki, even folks who’ve sailed for years make mistakes, sometimes painful ones like yours. It’s a reminder to us all to be attentive to what we’re doing, but so hard to practice in real life! I wouldn’t have plates and screws in one ankle if I always was paying attention. :p
    Anyway, like someone commented on your video over at YouTube, chilling down the burned area until it stays cool is paramount to stop the injury from getting worse. It’s a literal burn, that needs to be cooled to stop the damage. It helps with the pain (a little, anyway) too. Keep it dry and clean, and hopefully it will heal fully before your sailing class.
    Thank you, thank you, thank you for taking us out for dinner and drinks. It’s been fun. 😀

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  • Deb

    Have you checked out the vlog, Sundowner Sails Again? They have done the reverse of what you are doing: drydocking their sailboat and traveling the country in an RV. No matter how you slice it; adventure awaits! Love your videos!

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  • Another great story. I really liked the style you edited this in. Keep it up.

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  • Darren Boggs

    Loved this video and the cats are adorable!

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  • Jason Glesby

    Great video just think you will never do that again! Just remember we all make mistakes.are you in Ft Lauderdale if so try Flip Flops great little bar with docking and live music.

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  • Jon

    Great video…..Hope your Hand is Better before Sailing School……

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  • You are doing it! Don’t rush the process; we want to hear about every step.
    I’m sure many of us (RVers) are watching with the same thought, “just maybe…..one day…. but first, let’s watch and learn from the Wynns.” Thanks for sharing.

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  • Following your adventures is like reading a book you cannot put down! You just want to read more and more! Thanks for your excellent style of sharing. Question: when you are sailing do you have to clear counter tops, etc. like in your RV to keep things from rolling around? What’s your system? Happy (sea) trails!

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  • Rhonda

    We love you too and wish we knew about you when you where in our home state (Alaska). Thanks much for taking on your journeys!

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  • LOVE the video and spending a couple days with you. LIfe on the sailboat sure is different from life on the RV. Kudos for the editing job which I thought was great! So happy to spend time with you on your sailboat.

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    • Rhonda

      I love that they are taking us with!!!!

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